Turkey's Transformation and American Policy

By Yesilada, Birol | The Middle East Journal, Summer 2001 | Go to article overview

Turkey's Transformation and American Policy


Yesilada, Birol, The Middle East Journal


Turkey's Transformation and American Policy, ed. by Morton Abramowitz. New York: The Century Foundation Press, 2000. vii + 266 pages. Notes to p. 281. Index to p. 295. Contribs. to p. 298. $24.95.

This edited volume is an excellent overview of Turkey's transformation during the last two decades and the effect of these changes on USTurkey relations. Contributors include prominent scholars and analysts on Turkey, as well as former diplomats of the US State Department who share first-hand experiences with the readers. The task of the book is quite monumental, and the authors succeed in giving the readers a thorough account of the domestic and external challenges Turkish leaders face. These include political and socioeconomic developments, Turkey's foreign policy and security concerns, the impact of the end of the Cold War on Turkey's relations with her Allies and neighbors, and a discussion of what the future holds. The book is organized logically into two parts, with the first three chapters analyzing domestic challenges and the last four chapters examining Turkey's external relations with a special focus on American policy.

The chapter by Heath Lowry explores Turkey's changing political structure and cleavages, which hold the key to the country's future stability. His candid assessment of the Turgut Ozal decade is refreshing. The author correctly points out that economic liberalization in Turkey was put in place "without any meaningful legal infrastructure or controls to regulate and limit its excesses" (p. 27). This is indeed the root cause of socioeconomic inequality that came to characterize Turkey's economic liberalization in the 1980s. Subsequent voter realignment and the socio-political problems of the 1990s can be viewed as byproducts of Ozal's economic policies.

Philip Robins' chapter is an in-depth look at how the Kurdish question evolved into a multidimensional complex problem that divides the country. Its domestic implications touch on identity issues, social and economic inequality, and difficulties faced with political mobility channels (e.g., political parties) through which Kurds could voice their aspirations. It is disappointing, however, that the question of how this problem affects Turkey's external relations receives little attention, i.e., some reference to the European Union (EU) and the Middle East (pp. 73-75). Robins then provides three very important and plausible scenarios for how Turkey's Kurdish problem might play out in the foreseeable future. They are realistic and thought provoking.

The economic shortcomings of Turkey's transformation follow in a chapter by Ziya Onis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Turkey's Transformation and American Policy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.