Support Trade Justice! Support Fair Trade

New Internationalist, December 2004 | Go to article overview

Support Trade Justice! Support Fair Trade


The idea of fair trade began in the late 1940s when churches in North America and Europe sought to provide relief to refugees by selling their handicrafts to Northern markets. Then in 1988 'Max Havelaar', the first fair trade certification initiative was launched in Holland. The name was taken from a fictional character who opposed the exploitation of coffee pickers in Dutch colonies. In 1997, the Fair Trade Labelling Organization (FLO) brought Max Havelaar together with counterparts in other countries. Today, the FLO operates in 19 countries in Europe, Japan, North America, Mexico, Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa.

Compared to conventional trading structures, these Alternative Trade Organizations or ATOs offered higher returns to producers in the developing world through direct trade and fair prices. The fair trade movement is a response to a global trading system that is both unjust and exploitative. As the Filipino economist Waiden BeIIo has written: 'Trade can be good or bad for national development - it all depends on the rules that guide it.'

Unfortunately, the rules are rigged to benefit the rich and marginalize the poor. Fair trade is an attempt to reverse that bias. It's not going to fix the global system. That will take major institutional changes and a determined campaign.

Fair trade principles

* Producers are paid a fair price and workers a fair wage. For crops like coffee, tea and bananas, farmers are paid a stable minimum price.

* The links between buyers and sellers are shortened, doing away with 'middle men'.

* Buyers and producers develop long-term relationships of mutual support and benefit.

* All aspects of the trading relationship are open to public accountability

* Exploitative child labour and forced labour are prohibited.

* Working conditions are healthy and safe.

* Goods are produced and crops grown in an environmentally sustainable way.

The fair trade movement provides what educators call 'a teachable moment', a chance to find out about the blatant unfairness of the global trading system. And to set standards that could redefine global trade to include social and environmental considerations.

There are hundreds of fair trade organizations across the North.

We list the major umbrella organizations here. Follow the links to find out more.

Australia and New Zealand/Aotearoa

Fair Trade Association Fosters and promotes common understanding of fair trade. Assists co-ordination of fair trade activities, supports disadvantaged producers in developing countries to access markets, and helped introduce the FLO certification and labelling system. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Support Trade Justice! Support Fair Trade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.