Ohio State University College of Education Honors Diversity Leader

Black Issues in Higher Education, December 3, 2004 | Go to article overview

Ohio State University College of Education Honors Diversity Leader


COLUMBUS, OHIO

The Ohio State University College of Education honored Dr. Anne Pruitt-Logan, a nationally recognized leader in graduate programming to attract members of minorities and women to teaching careers in universities.

Induction into the Hall of Fame is the highest honor the college bestows.

Pruitt-Logan, of Mclean, Va., has centered her work on the preparation of future faculty in mathematics and science, particularly women and people of color. Her groundbreaking work shaped the way state higher education systems, colleges and universities increased accessibility and opportunities.

Pruitt-Logan is emeritus professor of educational policy and leadership at Ohio State, where she also served as associate provost, associate dean of the Graduate School and director of the Center for Teaching Excellence. After leaving Ohio State in 1995, she served for eight years at the Council of Graduate Schools, where she co-directed the Preparing Future Faculty program. She received $3 million in grants, including funds from the National Science Foundation. She has served as a consultant to numerous projects and educational boards.

Prior to coming to Ohio State, she held faculty and administrative positions at Case Western Reserve and Fisk universities, and Albany State College. …

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Ohio State University College of Education Honors Diversity Leader
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