Exam Techniques


We lecturers like to see our students panic to the point of being in the loo 24 hours a day.

Not true, we want to see you do well as it reflects on how well we are doing our job.

Failure will ruin your life.

Failing an exam is not the end of the world, so keep your anxieties in proper proportion.

The exam could expose you as a fool and a fraud.

Everyone wants you to pass, even the examiner.

You should have read everything on the course before attempting the exam.

Don't worry about what you haven't done during the course. Work out how to make the best use of what you have done.

If you have not understood what you have read, it isn't worth taking the exam.

No one understands "everything". There are bound to be areas where you feel under prepared and confused.

Exam papers are unreadable

Don't panic when you read exam questions. Almost every exam question is linked directly to your course. You just have to work out the link.

Exams are for people with a good memory.

Exams tend to be about what you understand, rather than what you can remember. Getting your course notes organised will sort your memory out.

You will have to revise until you drop.

You will probably do a lot of work just before your exam. But you need to do it in a planned way, using your time effectively and efficiently and conserving your energies. You don't want to turn your life into a compete misery just because of an exam.

Revising

Should you revise?

YES!

What is the point of revising?

Revising is the process of tidying up the mess and getting your notes into perspective and put it into a working order.

When should you start your revision for the exam?

Well some students cram it in the night before others spend a long time revising it - depends on you.

Get hold of exam papers.

This is essential as it can help you get into the frame of mind for exams and lets you find out the style of exams questions that will be posed.

It will make you gulp the first time you read the paper but surely this is better than doing it on the day. It helps you to prepare and get your mind set. …

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