Seeking Spiritual Renewal in Jordan

By Dyer, Ervin | The Crisis, July/August 2004 | Go to article overview

Seeking Spiritual Renewal in Jordan


Dyer, Ervin, The Crisis


I stood on the road to Damascus. And as it was for the prophet Paul, for me, too, it was life-altering. I was in Jordan, amid the ruins of Jerash, a once-popular trading center built by the Romans.

There is not much there now, but long ago, chariots set out from this city on grand, cobble-stone highways that led to Damascus, Jericho and Jerusalem. To many, Jordan may seem a foreboding destination. But after braving the unfamiliar, I found the country offers cultural, religious and political insights into an area much-maligned and misunderstood.

Being in Jordan is an act of faith. Many Americans are threatened away by the trouble close to its borders. Next door is Iraq, where deadly violence and anti-American sentiment seems to escalate with the passing of each day in the wake of the U.S.-led war. On the other side, Jordan is divided from Israel, a place wracked by bloody religious turmoil, only by the narrow Jordan River.

Conflicts in the region have propelled Jordan, a nation about the size of Indiana, into the news. Two of Saddam Hussein's daughters and their nine children have been allowed to stay in the country. In April, Jordan's King Abdullah, a Middle-East leader friendly with the United States, criticized the White House for not being committed enough to ending the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Later in the month, several terrorists were arrested there for plotting to bomb the U.S. Embassy in Amman, Jordan's capital.

The U.S. State Department advises Americans to be extremely cautious if they travel to the country. Still when the opportunity to travel to Jordan this spring with a group of ministers and journalists presented itself, I jumped at the opportunity to experience the Middle East beyond the filters of CNN and MSNBC.

First of all, Jordan, a modern Muslim nation that enjoys peaceful relations with Israel, is considered a Middle East oasis. I went into the romantic heart of the country. I spent a night in the desert where Lawrence of Arabia was filmed; walked amid the glory of Petra, the red-rose city carved from sandstone; and drew close to the swashbuckling Bedouins. My 10-day experience was transforming. I visited the orange sands in the desert of Wadi Rum, the sparkling shores of Aqaba, which sits on the Red Sea, and the gleaming white stone buildings of the nation's capital.

Most Americans think of Israel as housing the origins of Christianity. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Seeking Spiritual Renewal in Jordan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.