Managing Food Industry Waste

By Walker, Paul | NACTA Journal, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Managing Food Industry Waste


Walker, Paul, NACTA Journal


Managing Food Industry Waste By Robert R. Zall, Blackwell Publishing, 2004, hardcover, 182 pages, $79.99

This book is a valuable reference that should be at the disposal of industry professionals (including food processing plant managers, environmental engineers and solid waste coordinators) environmental consultants, government agency staff (EPA and natural resource personnel, etc) and academicians (teachers, extension specialists and researchers). This book is not an engineering text about how to build and operate waste processing facilities. This book is a summary of the experiences and knowledge in managing waste gained by Dr. Robert Zall over a period of 40+ years as a professional manager, sought-after consultant, avid scientist and ardent teacher. The common sense narrative shares his wisdom on the subject of waste management in a practical, easy to read, accessible format.

A far too frequently expressed opinion of food-processing plant managers and CEO's is that they are in the business of producing finished food products and not in the waste management business. Unfortunately, many in the food industry do not recognize that improving in-plant waste abatement methods is less expensive and more profitable than end-of-the-plant waste treatment. The narrative of this book directly addresses these issues in an informative manner based on previous real-world experiences. Accordingly, because the narrative exposes these philosophical perspectives so commonly shared by industry and provides applied solutions based on specific situations, this book is a must read for agency staff charged with enforcing legislated regulations and for educating and training future environmental engineers. …

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