"Just Therapy" with Families on Low Incomes

By Waldegrave, Charles | Child Welfare, March/April 2005 | Go to article overview

"Just Therapy" with Families on Low Incomes


Waldegrave, Charles, Child Welfare


This article addresses the inadequacies of counseling, therapy, and social work that occurs with low-income families. The author argues that many families who seek help arrive with problems that are usually assessed separately from their socioeconomic and cultural contexts. Careful questioning will often lead to the discovery that the onset of many family problems are located in events external to the family, such as unemployment, bad housing, and racist, sexist, or heterosexist experiences. They can be extremely depressing ongoing experiences that eventually lead parents and children into a state of stress that opens them up to physical and mental illnesses. This article argues that a wide body of research supports such a view and that counseling, therapeutic, and social work practices should address these issues much more directly. It also argues that practitioners have an important role to play in social and economic policy development out of respect for their clients' struggles.

When we speak of families and therapy, we tend to think in mental health or relationship categories. In this article, the term families refers to any primary intimate group, who either through genealogy or intentional commitment identify themselves as family. The term therapy in this context refers to the healing and problem-solving discourses that the helping professions carry out, including those of psychologists, social workers, counselors, psychiatrists, and nurses. A family in need of therapy may require help because of the unpredictable behavior of one or a number of household members, or because relationships between members have become disrupted in some way. If, instead of referring simply to families, we refer to poor families, we are triggered into issues of context.

Addressing the Context

What is good therapy when families are poor? How does a therapist address relationships when parents who struggle to feed their families are not able to access decent housing? Do current clinical and therapeutic courses adequately prepare students to address the therapeutic issues of poor families? The words families and therapy tend to elicit a reasonably predictable set of expectations, but if one uses the adjective poor to describe a set of particular families, those expectations become challenged.

Consider for example, how a group of therapists are likely to answer the question, "What is absolutely basic to a family or family life?" They would probably answer along the following lines: There must be at least a minimal commitment to relationship among members. There must be some evidence of emotional warmth among members. There must be some cooperative patterns of behavior that order at least some of their life together, and one would hope that there would be some evidence of what is referred to in the non-social science world as love.

Consider now how a group of community workers may answer the same question concerning what is absolutely basic to a family or family life. They would probably answer along the following lines: Families require adequate and safe housing. They require sufficient income to live out of poverty. They need to be able to access affordable health care, and they need to be able to live free from fear and harassment.

Both views, of course, are correct in as far as they go, but their emphases are quite different. One is focused primarily on family dynamics, whereas the other is focused primarily on social and economic context. The same divergence of views would probably occur if therapists and community workers were asked a further question: "What causes the problems of poorer families who visit therapists for help?"

Many therapists, when referring to particular stresses poor families face, would probably still make a list characterized by the following sorts of problems: inadequacies in communication, the loss of emotional warmth, tensions in relationships, an inability to make decisions, and difficulties resolving conflict. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

"Just Therapy" with Families on Low Incomes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.