Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II

By Bernstein, Lewis | Military Review, September/October 2001 | Go to article overview

Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II


Bernstein, Lewis, Military Review


EMBRACING DEFEAT: Japan in the Wake of World War II, John W. Dower, W.W. Norton & Co., The New Press, NY, 1999, 676 pages, $29.95.

Nominated for the 1999 National Book Award for Nonfiction, Embracing Defeat illuminates obscure aspects of Japan's occupation after World War II. John W. Dower has written several books about the period but has avoided repeating, in detail, political and social themes. American works about the occupation usually show how American ideas and methods reshaped Japanese society. Japanese works show how those ideas and methods were modified.

Dower has no patience with the view that the United States, personified by US General Douglas MacArthur, bestowed democracy on a grateful Japan, causing it to live happily ever after. In fact, Dower devotes much space to discussing the occupation government's conceits.

Dower adopts a critical view, skewering absurdities and pretensions, such as censorship regulations. For example, it was forbidden to criticize the Soviet Union during the Cold War's early days because it was one of the Allies that had participated in Japan's defeat. In fact, it was illegal to even mention censorship's existence.

By examining what people read, heard and saw, Dower recreates a specific historic moment, showing how the occupation affected ordinary urban Japanese during that time of extreme poverty. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Embracing Defeat: Japan in the Wake of World War II
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.