Sound Off


Views of VFW members on topics of interest to veterans.

February's Question:

Can you support the troops while opposing the war?

VFW members overwhelmingly believe troop support is vital, even if they do not necessarily agree with the war in Iraq.

Going to war is a political decision-right or wrong-made by elected officials, not military leaders. Support for troops does not automatically equate or coincide with the decision to go to war.

Troops are being well-trained, well-equipped, properly housed and given fair compensation for their sacrifices. Citizens need their troops to be of the highest caliber possible, but may have legitimate disagreements with the decision to go to war.

David Perl, Colorado

Without these dedicated young men and women in uniform, we would not be enjoying the freedoms we have today. Oppose the war all you want, but remember that the military is following orders.

Douglas Eddins, Nevada

You can't send mixed signals to the military and not erode their morale. Imagine how differently WWII might have turned out if we sent an unsupportive message to the troops back then.

Russ Duenow, Wisconsin

Most people oppose some aspects of war in one way or another. But we all need to support our troops because they are the ones who protect our way of life and our freedom. Riots and protest only destroy the morale of the troops.

Walter Price, Missouri

Welcome the troops home, have a parade and get media coverage of these events. You also can write your congressman to let him know where you stand on VA issues and concurrent receipt. This will show the troops that they have your support. I adamantly oppose the war in Iraq, but I support those who are fighting it 100%.

Rick McGrath, South Dakota

It's not a question at all-we have to support our troops. It is the very least they can expect from their fellow citizens. Having served in Vietnam and returned to hostile attitudes, I am so pleased that so many have come out in support of the troops in Iraq. They deserve that respect.

Larry Douglas, Washington

It is not possible to claim to support the troops, yet be opposed to the war. …

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