Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism Religion, and Literature 1600-1745

By Walker, William T. | Anglican and Episcopal History, March 2000 | Go to article overview

Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism Religion, and Literature 1600-1745


Walker, William T., Anglican and Episcopal History


RAYMOND D. TUMBLESON. Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism Religion, and Literature 1600-1745. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Pp. ix + 254, introduction, notes, index. $54.95.

The period from the Stuart accession to the throne in 1603 to the last Jacobite challenge in 1745 by Charles Edward Stuart (Bonnie Prince Charlie) was an era during which England was transformed into a modern state and society. With the English Civil War, Restoration, Glorious Revolution and the continuing wars against France, it was a turbulent and violent period. Yet, during this same period, England experienced the growth of civil society and sustained a continuing cultural development that reflected the progression from the early Stuart to the Augustan age of the Hanoverians. The legacy of the Reformation and the virulent anti-Catholicism of the late Elizabethan era was still manifested in the image in which Catholicism was held in the English mind. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the English Catholic community (also known as the "recusants") experienced some periods of overt oppression; however, for the most part, they could practice their religion quietly, but not in public. After 1688, Catholic bishops were active in England. Raymond Tumbleson's Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism, Religion, and Literature 1600-1745 is not about the English recusants, but rather it is a careful study of the formative impact of the idea of "Catholicism" on the English mentalité and its subsequent reflection on the national character.

Tumbleston, who teaches English at Kutztown University in Pennsylvania, has revised his doctoral dissertation and developed a lucid and meaningful text that should be of interest to scholars interested in English literature and history. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Catholicism in the English Protestant Imagination: Nationalism Religion, and Literature 1600-1745
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.