Episcopalians & Race: Civil War to Civil Rights

By Griffin, Paul R. | Anglican and Episcopal History, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Episcopalians & Race: Civil War to Civil Rights


Griffin, Paul R., Anglican and Episcopal History


GARDINER H. SHATTUCK, JR. Episcopalians & Race: Civil War to Civil Rights. Lexington, Kentucky: University Press of Kentucky, 2000. Pp. xiii + 298, illustrations, index. $32.50.

Gardiner H. Shattuck, Jr. seems to have one goal for this historical study. This is to move beyond the now almost commonplace politically correct and dispassionate discussions of race and racism and engage a more rigorous and straightforward analysis of how and why these twin issues remain so prominent in sacred tabernacles, in this case, the Episcopal Church. Starting with the Civil War years and moving to the civil rights years of the 1960s, Shattuck weaves a well-documented and riveting story of how racism in Episcopalianism-despite having been stripped of some of its pre-1960s overt vicious expressions-still persists with great energy and pervasiveness today. The author pins us to our seats with concrete examples of how although racial bigotry in present day Episcopalianism is no longer marked by the overt viciousness of the past, racism continues to hold sway in this denomination. Among the examples Shattuck cites to defend his position is the decision of his church not to move its 1991 General Convention away from Phoenix, Arizona, when a slim majority of voters in that state defeated a "referendum that would have created a holiday honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr."

Daring to mix his scholarly historical analysis with his own personal experiences as a member of the Episcopal Church, Shattuck draws the conclusion that there is only one reason why his denomination made that decision. Many Episcopalians failed to understand and hence transcend their past racial history. Shattuck rightly points out that history had been marked by a combination of concrete bigoted acts and ambivalence. While present day Episcopalianism-motivated by the civil rights struggles of the 1960s-has been able to free itself of the old outright bigoted attitudes, Shattuck insists that racism still exists because Episcopalians have failed to take a clear and firm stand against it. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Episcopalians & Race: Civil War to Civil Rights
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.