Norfolk State University President Resigns

Black Issues in Higher Education, April 7, 2005 | Go to article overview

Norfolk State University President Resigns


Dr. Marie McDemmond cites health issues as reason for stepping down

NORFOLK, VA.

Dr. Marie V. McDemmond announced to the Norfolk State University Board of Visitors that health issues will force her to step down as president of the university. McDemmond indicated to the board that her illness, while serious, is containable with proper care and a much less rigorous schedule.

McDemmond will step down on June 30, after serving eight years as president of Virginia's largest historically Black university. In 1997, McDemmond became the first woman to lead NSU and the first African-American woman to serve as president of a four-year college in Virginia. At that time she inherited an institution with an operating deficit and a history of under-funding that dated back to the early 1960s. Using her background in financial management, she secured a state loan and instituted fiscally sound management practices. The last installment of the $4.1 million state loan was paid more than two years early.

Beginning in 1998, McDemmond worked with Gov. Jim Gilmore ( 1998-2002) and current Gov. Mark R. Warner, the Virginia legislature and the Legislative Black Caucus to secure state operating funds for six new academic programs. …

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