Legal Aspects of Work-Related Mental Illness and Disorder

By Adler, Stephen; Atlas, Renee | The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, October 1, 2004 | Go to article overview

Legal Aspects of Work-Related Mental Illness and Disorder


Adler, Stephen, Atlas, Renee, The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences


Abstract: Workers' compensation laws exist to compensate workers for injuries sustained on the job. In Israel, this includes mental as well as physical injuries, both generally described by the law as "work accidents." Courts readily accept mental injuries as work-related when they are caused by physical work events. In cases where a physical event precipitates mental injury, courts allow presumptions of work-relatedness as proof of part of the case. However, when a psychological event causes a psychological illness (referred to as "purely psychological" cases), courts must grapple with ascertaining whether these non-visible, internal events, often accompanied by multiple causes, have the requisite work connection to justify compensation. Ultimately, a court requires proof of each aspect of a purely psychological case to assure itself of the legitimacy of the claim. To provide courts with requisite proof of work-relatedness, a claimant in a purely psychological case must show that the event was sudden, unexpected, severe, and that it was caused in significant part by work, as viewed objectively, rather than on the basis of a claimant's subjective perception of reality. Gradual events, such as repetitive work stress, are generally not compensated. Presumptions of work-relatedness will not apply. The workers' compensation system cannot bear the burden for psychological events that occur as a usual part of the work environment or that are the result of multiple non-work-related causes.

Introduction

Israel's National Insurance Law is a cradle-to-grave public social welfare system (1). Its provisions follow those insured from the womb, where they can receive maternity hospitalization grants, through the grave, where they can receive a burial allowance. If the person insured is a worker, the mandatory payment to the National Insurance Fund is made through the employer and is a proportion of his or her wages (1, 2). The subject of this article is one type of benefit covered by the National Insurance Law: Work Accident Insurance, which is financed solely by the employers. Work Accident Insurance, which we will refer to as Workers' Compensation (or "WC") provides compensation for workers who are injured on the job. In Israel, self-employed workers are also covered by WC.

Prior to the WC law, workers who were injured at work needed to prove in a court that their injury was caused by their employer's negligence in order to win money for the injury and for their inability to work and earn an income (3, 4). The WC law replaced the negligence system with a "no-fault" system. Under WC law, it no longer matters who caused the on-the-job injury, so long as the injury arose out of or occurred at work (3). In exchange for not having to prove himself or herself free of fault, or the employer guilty of fault, the worker's recovery under WC law is limited to his or her earnings or to a proportion of those earnings (3). The employer benefits from WC law because in most states (excluding Israel) an employee who brings a WC case is disallowed from bringing other lawsuits against the employer (3).

In Israel, a claim for any work injury begins with an application to the National Insurance Institute (4). The worker, whom we will call the claimant, or plaintiff, can appeal a denial of workers' compensation. The labor courts have exclusive authority to hear claims regarding National Insurance Law. (5). An appeal from a decision of the National Insurance Institute first goes to one of five regional labor courts, and can be appealed further by the unsuccessful party to the National Labor Court. There is no right of appeal to the Supreme Court, but that Court may hear a petition as the High Court of Justice (Bagatz) (5).

Only events that are sufficiently connected to work, by a pattern of facts recognized by the courts, will be eligible for a WC award (6). Claims in which a psychological injury results from a psychological event are being brought more frequently, due in part to the intensification of stresses at work (7). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Legal Aspects of Work-Related Mental Illness and Disorder
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.