Arabs in the Shadow of Israel: The Unfolding of God's Prophetic Plan for Ishmael's Line

By Borger, J. Todd | Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society, March 2005 | Go to article overview

Arabs in the Shadow of Israel: The Unfolding of God's Prophetic Plan for Ishmael's Line


Borger, J. Todd, Journal of the Evangelical Theological Society


Arabs in the Shadow of Israel: The Unfolding of God's Prophetic Plan for Ishmael's Line. By Tony Maalouf. Grand Rapids: Kregel, 2003, 368 pp., $14.99 paper.

The conversation between Islam and Christianity has heated greatly in the past few years because of the terrorist tactics of militant Islamic groups and the response by the West. An innocent victim in this battle is the Arab culture. Although many have employed the terms "Arab" and "Muslim" synonymously, the truth is that many Arabs are not Muslims and the vast majority of Muslims are not Arabs. This unfortunate identification of the two cultures has confused the relationship between westerners and the non-Muslim Arabs of the Middle East. Tony Maalouf has tried in his book Arabs in the Shadow of Israel to contribute to the conversation between Arabs and Christians by noting the prophetic promises made to Ishmael, how those promises unfolded throughout biblical history, and the eschatological implications of those promises.

After an historical introduction that briefly surveys the history of the Arab people, Maalouf presents his case concerning God's promises to Ishmael's descendants. His presentation is organized in four categories drawn from different periods of Israelite and Christian history, which serve as a framework to show the relationship of the Arab people to the history of God's chosen people Israel. Part 1, "Biblical Foundations," explores the history of Ishmael through the stories of Hagar and Ishmael in Genesis 16, 17, and 21. He includes a chapter on Paul's interpretation of those stories in Galatians 4. Part 2, "Arabs in the Light of Israel," explains the contribution of Arabs and their theology to the biblical witness during the time of the united monarchy, chiefly through the wisdom literature of Job and Proverbs. Part 3, "Arabs in the Darkness of Israel," describes the history of the Arabs in the post-exilic period. Finally, part 4, "Arabs in the Light of Christ," links the Arabs to the Jewish messianic expectations, and makes a particular connection between the Arabs and the Magi worshipers of the child Jesus.

Maalouf makes several important contributions in his book. To begin with, this book will benefit anyone doing exegetical work on the Ishmael passages of the OT. He comments on Arabic sources perhaps otherwise unknown to the reader; see particularly the endnotes for the Introduction (pp. 225-31). Also, his discussion of the work of God outside of Israel is a controversial and important subject. The most significant theological contribution of the book, however, is the placement of the Arabs in God's eschatological plan (pp. 219-24). Maalouf contends the promises to Ishmael's descendants made to Hagar have placed Arabs in a special place in the economy of God's salvation. They occupy, in a sense, a middle ground between God's elect, Israel, and the surrounding nations (pp. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Arabs in the Shadow of Israel: The Unfolding of God's Prophetic Plan for Ishmael's Line
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.