Georgetown Forum Examines the Crisis in Arab-American Relations

By Hanley, Delinda C. | Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, July 2005 | Go to article overview

Georgetown Forum Examines the Crisis in Arab-American Relations


Hanley, Delinda C., Washington Report on Middle East Affairs


The Center for Contemporary Arab Studies (CCAS) at Georgetown University hosted an April 26 forum on "Bridging the Gap: A Forum on the Crisis in Arab-American Relations." CCAS director Michael Hudson opened the conference by noting that, since 9/11, public opinion in the Arab world has turned against the U.S. government and some of its policies in the region. While the Bush administration is actively promoting political and economic reform in the region-both for its own sake and to diminish "the terrorist threat"-the president's campaign is producing both positive and negative responses, Hudson said.

At the same time, he noted, the American public is demonstrating increasingly negative attitudes toward Arabs and Muslims.

"Under such conditions, what are the prospects for the U.S. winning 'hearts and minds' in the Arab and Muslim worlds?" Hudson asked. "And what can societies and governments in the region do to repair the relationship with America?"

To search for answers to these questions, the CCAS Forum invited several prominent public intellectuals from the Arab world, Europe, and the United States to offer their own analyses and to debate the issues with each other and the audience, made up of members of the Washington academic and policy communities.

The first panel, on "Arab Perspectives," was moderated by Hudson and included Hussein Hassouna, ambassador of the League of Arab States, and Abdul-Rahman al-Saeed, adviser to Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Abdullah. Hassouna wondered if there really is a crisis in Arab-American relations or if, instead, there are people with an agenda in think tanks and the media trying to portray a crisis. "The 'Arab man on the street' admires American prosperity, lifestyles, institutions and culture," Hassouna said. "He has a big problem with American policies."

According to Dr. Al-Saeed, who earned his doctorate from Georgetown in 1976, since 9/11 there has been a serious setback in U.S./Arab relations. He lamented the fact that it is now difficult for Arab students to attend school in this country. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Georgetown Forum Examines the Crisis in Arab-American Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.