Weighing the Costs of Presenteeism

By Dixon, Keith | Chief Executive (U.S.), June 2005 | Go to article overview

Weighing the Costs of Presenteeism


Dixon, Keith, Chief Executive (U.S.)


CEOS MAY BE BURNING OUT THEIR WORK FORCES. BY KEITH DIXON

Woody Allen once said that 80 percent of success is simply showing up. But most chief executives rcalize that in today's business environment, simply showing up no longer cuts it.

To that effect, you already know that absenteeism hurts your bottom line. But have you considered what presenteeism is costing your business?

Unlike absenteeism, presenteeism is the new buzzword to describe low productivity of employees who are at work. It comes from distractions, be it physical (malaise, exhaustion), mental (concentration problems, depression) or because of problems at home (cldercarc, childcare issues) or at work (job security or performance concerns). It also comes from worker burnout-the exhaustion of mental and physical resources to complete self-perceived unrealistic work demands.

The Harvard Business Review estimates that presentccism costs American businesses $150 billion annually in direct and indirect costs. And if yon believe that your hnman resources department has it under control, think again. Most don't think that it is their responsibility, nor want to admit there is a problem.

Like most things, if presentccism isn't prevented, minimized or managed, it can give rise to depression or substance abuse, increased disability claims and higher overall medical costs. In other words, it can undermine a company as much-or more-than better-known workplace challenges such as absenteeism.

The management of employee stress, performance anxiety and work/life balance isn't just for 1IR to focus on. In fact, HR people typically expeet line-management to handle these types of problems. Bnt when all things are considered, presenteeism should be managed as closely as employee turnover or the cost of health care benefits.

Presenteeism is much more difficult than absenteeism to measure, but researchers have found that lost productivity due to presenteeism is, on average, 7.5 times greater than that lost to absenteeism. Moreover, recent industry studies show that productivity losses due to health-related presenteeism amount to three times that spent on direct medical costs. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Weighing the Costs of Presenteeism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.