Influence, Translation, and Parallels: Selected Studies on the Bible in China

By Meynard, Thierry | International Bulletin of Missionary Research, July 2005 | Go to article overview

Influence, Translation, and Parallels: Selected Studies on the Bible in China


Meynard, Thierry, International Bulletin of Missionary Research


Influence, Translation, and Parallels: Selected Studies on the Bible in China. By Marián Gálik. Nettetal, Ger.: Steyler Verlag, 2004. (Institut Monumenta Serica, Sankt Augustin.) Pp. 351. euro48.

Marián Gálik explains in the epilogue that the Bible was the first book he read, though he was unable to read it freely in his native Communist Czechoslovakia. Later he specialized in the modern literature of China, where he unexpectedly discovered that the Bible was very much alive.

This volume, separated into two parts, gathers sixteen essays, most of them previously published. Unavoidably, the reader will find some repetitions. The first part deals with translations of the Bible into Chinese, especially the Union Version (1919), and it discusses literary critics such as Zhu Weizhi (himself a Christian, discussing the status of the Bible as part of world literature and looking at the Bible, especially the Psalms and the Book of Lamentations, as a history of national suffering), Zhu Yunbin and Niu Yongmao (interested in the love poems of the Song of Songs), and Du Benhai (focusing on the creation story of Genesis).

Part 2 analyzes several creative works inspired by the Bible. In a 1942 novel Mao Dun tells the story of the revenge of Samson against the femme fatale Delilah, where the Philistines symbolize the Japanese; Xiang Peiliang in Annen (1926), a one-act play, turns the love of Amnon for Tamar into a sexual aberration; the writer Gu Cheng, personally obsessed by the death of Christ, writes the novel Ying'er, then becomes insane, killing his wife and hanging himself in 1993; Wang Duqing understands Jesus as an illegitimate son, displaying in a poem on the Virgin Mary (1925) some decadent tendencies; Wang Meng, minister of culture before Tiananmen, takes inspiration from the Apocalypse, describing in The Cross (1988) how the fourth animal, Christ's negative mirror, brings destruction into the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Influence, Translation, and Parallels: Selected Studies on the Bible in China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.