Nuns as Artists: The Visual Culture of a Medieval Convent

Magistra, Winter 1998 | Go to article overview

Nuns as Artists: The Visual Culture of a Medieval Convent


Hamburger, Jeffrey.

(Berkeley: University of California Press, 1997) 318 pages, cloth $55, ISBN 0-520-20386-0.

As a Benedictine, I have been repeatedly frustrated over the years with the tendency amongst scholars to ignore a healthy hermeneutic of suspicion in minimizing the contributions of my monastic foremothers, and therefore of most women. I have been privileged to visit my community's grossmutterhaus, Saint Walburga's in Eichstatt, Germany. The walls, shelves and corners are filled with over 900 years of hearty and healthy living. There are letters from Teresa of Avila, books owned by Anne Boleyn and other royalty, and paintings by some of the nuns and by local believers who brought them as thank-offerings to Saint Walburga for prayers answered.

I was delighted to encounter Jeffrey Hamburgers book. He has taken seriously the artistic work or nonnenarbeiten of unnamed nuns at Eichstatt, devotional pieces produced around 1500. Fortunately for the reader, these art pieces are acknowledged and studied as vital and dynamic to the interior lives of these nuns.

Nuns As Artists begins with an analysis of the style and iconography of these images, setting them within the cultural context that produced them. Context is more than enclosure. Spiritual training, ecclesial control and monastic reform, or more accurately the birth of new forms of religious life, are also considered. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Nuns as Artists: The Visual Culture of a Medieval Convent
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.