France and Algeria: A History of Decolonization and Transformation

By Perkins, Kenneth J. | The Middle East Journal, Autumn 2001 | Go to article overview

France and Algeria: A History of Decolonization and Transformation


Perkins, Kenneth J., The Middle East Journal


France and Algeria: A History of Decolonization and Transformation, by Phillip C. Naylor. Gainesville, FL: University Press of Florida, 2000. xviii + 290 pages. Maps. Abbrevs. Notes to p. 387. Sel. bibl. to p. 427. Index to p. 457. $49.95.

For the 132 years that Algeria formed the core of France's overseas holdings, the North African territory assumed a crucial role in shaping France itself-as an imperial entity, an economic power, and a champion of Western civilization and Gallic culture. Thus, when Algeria gained its independence in 1962, France confronted a difficult, and previously unthinkable, question: Did the loss of Algeria fundamentally alter the essence of France? Because Algerians had found it difficult to define themselves or their nation during the colonial era-caught as they were between an Arabo-Berber-Islamic heritage and domination by foreigners who did their best to repress, control, or manipulate that heritage-independence posed for them a somewhat different, but not unrelated, challenge. The very existence of an Algerian state, so vigorously denied for so long, had now to be affirmed. This study utilizes the "essentialistexistentialist" quandary as a paradigm in order to track the continuities and discontinuities in the post-colonial relationship between the new state and its former colonizer. As difficult as political decolonization had been in the years between the advent of the French Fifth Republic in 1958 and the signing of the Evian Accords in 1962, it proved easier to achieve than its economic, social, or cultural counterparts. Given the intensity and complexity of the colonial experience for both sides, it is not surprising that a philosophy of "independence with interdependence," which devoted only limited attention to the detachment of Algeria from France in these areas, initially prevailed. The Algiers Accords of 1965 envisioned a reinterpretation of bilateral linkages, but it became clear that the French perceptions of the new arrangement required Algeria to set aside key national ambitions, particularly with regard to hydrocarbons, over which a crisis developed. The ensuing nationalizations in 1971 achieved the economic decolonization of Algeria. Although the relationship stagnated for the remainder of the decade, Algeria, for both cultural and strategic reasons, continued to retain a central place in France's view of itself and of the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

France and Algeria: A History of Decolonization and Transformation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.