The Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association: A Fifty Year History 1951-2001

By Bridges, Jane | Journal of the Medical Library Association, January 2004 | Go to article overview

The Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association: A Fifty Year History 1951-2001


Bridges, Jane, Journal of the Medical Library Association


HODGES, T. MARK. The Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association: A Fifty Year History 1951-2001. Nashville, TN: Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association, 2001. 79 p. (Text available at http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ biolib / scmla / hist.htm)

This volume was in response to the Medical Library Association's (MLA's) request for each MLA chapter to compile an individual history. MLA was about to mark its 100th anniversary, and the Southern Chapter was about to celebrate its fiftieth.

At first glance, the volume appears to be merely a chronology of the chapter. On closer perusal, however, it stands out as a testimonial to the life and times of the profession. Unlike some works reviewed in this column, this book does not instruct the reader in a particular aspect of librarianship, nor does it showcase a new technology or define a trend. What the reader will glean from its pages is a quiet pride in the profession, a knowledgebase of its history, and a glimpse into the creation and life of a library organization juxtaposed against the times in which it was formed, has lived, and is developing.

The author organizes the chronology of the chapter into six stages: formation, expansion, contraction, reconstruction, maturation, and triumph. The appendixes are all data: a record of annual meeting dates and locations, officers, and notables from the region. These appendixes alone serve as an invaluable reference when conducting chapter business and answering retrospective questions. The footnotes, of course, are impeccable.

In his preface, the author affirms the value of chapters and regional meetings as opportunities for professionals who might not be able to attend national meetings because of distance or expense. He reasserts this several times elsewhere in the text.

The introduction includes the meetings of regional groups that were held during World War II. It is interesting that the nature of librarians does not seem to have changed. The needs assessment, roll taking, and other aspects of forming a group would have been little different fifty years later. It is also comforting to note that several points of formation were contentious. We tend to forget that the formation of what we see today as a smoothly operating organization may have been forged through controversy.

The section on formation uses a thread that continues throughout the work and is done in a world setting. It features the founders of MLA and accurately points out that the profession owes much to them. Another pearl that drops from these pages is the fact that the formation of the Southern Chapter predated the renaming of the Armed Forces Medical Library as the National Library of Medicine.

As has been the experience of many groups, the Southern Regional Group, later known as the Southern Chapter, sputtered through several fits and starts at its beginning. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Southern Chapter of the Medical Library Association: A Fifty Year History 1951-2001
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.