Low Unemployment in the South Contributing to Rise in Hispanic Population

By Nealy, Michelle | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, August 25, 2005 | Go to article overview

Low Unemployment in the South Contributing to Rise in Hispanic Population


Nealy, Michelle, Diverse Issues in Higher Education


WASHINGTON

The Hispanic population is growing faster in much of the South than anywhere else in the United States. From North Carolina to Alabama, Hispanic populations have emerged in communities where just a decade ago there were relatively few people of Latin descent, according to studies conducted by the Pew Hispanic Center and Georgetown University.

The center recently released a report that explores the rapid migration of Hispanics to the southern region of the United States. The report titled, "The New Latino South," was presented at the Immigration to New Settlement Areas conference held at the center in Washington last month.

"We are in the midst of one of the longest and largest waves of immigration in U.S. history," said Dr. Susan Martin, executive director for the Study of International Migration at Georgetown University, as she explained the tremendous growth and dispersal of Latino populations in the southern region of the United States.

The Pew report focuses on six states: Arkansas, Alabama, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. These states registered very fast rates of Hispanic population growth between 1990 and 2000, according to the U.S. Census.

"All of these states have at least tripled their Hispanic population, some even quadrupled their Hispanic population between 1990 and 2000," says Sonya Tafoya, a research associate for the Pew Hispanic Center.

The unemployment rates during 1990 through 2000 indicate that the prospect of work is the motivating factor that caused large numbers of young Hispanics to migrate to the South. …

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Low Unemployment in the South Contributing to Rise in Hispanic Population
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