Third Wave Washes Media [Third Wave Feminism]

By Rundle, Lisa | Herizons, Summer 2004 | Go to article overview

Third Wave Washes Media [Third Wave Feminism]


Rundle, Lisa, Herizons


Third wave feminism was in the news in March--not just once, but several times. Of course, the Ottawa Citizen's front-pager left readers thinking that the video game-inspired movie character Lara Croft is the archetypal third-waver. The writer wondered why most third wave role models are fictional--"more fashion than philosophy"?

[Graph Not Transcribed]

Gee--I mentioned Rebecca Walker (and several other non-fictional people) to the reporter. To my mind, Walker is one of the most articulate voices of the third wave, starting with her 1995 anthology To Be Real. "You have to at least read the introduction," I said as persuasively as I could. But Rebecca didn't make it. "You should have said she's Alice Walker's daughter," my partner suggested later. But I suspect even Alice's fame wouldn't have trumped the shots of Uma Thurman (from Kill Bill), Sarah Michelle Gellar (as Buffy) and, of course, Angelina Jolie's Lara. Not to mention that it would have ruined a great story on this new "feminism lite."

One surprising thing I learned from this media boon is that people have never heard of third wave feminism. "What is it?" reporters asked. "Young women won't call themselves feminist, right?" Who knew? It's easy--when you try to limit your circles to people who are appreciative of the systems of thought that govern your life--to forget that your circles are very small compared with the giant circle often called, suspiciously, the "General Public." The General Public is a strange character that has difficulty communicating with any kind of consistency and is ferociously fickle. I mean, one minute it's kicking Ellen off the air, the next it's loving up Will & Grace. (Yes, I've always suspected the GP was confused about its sexual identity.)

Some reporters tried to get full answers to their questions down right. But even when the third wave was taken seriously, it ended up pitted against the "dead" second wave (a health status sealed, apparently, by the decline of NAC). The mention at all of the third wave in the press can be traced to very much alive second-waver Judy Rebick, who actually knows and engages with real live third wave feminists. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Third Wave Washes Media [Third Wave Feminism]
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.