The Mentoring Induction Projects: Supporting Beginning Special Education Professionals-Curriculum Concerns of New Teachers

By Hoffengardner, Sandra | Teaching Exceptional Children, November/December 2001 | Go to article overview

The Mentoring Induction Projects: Supporting Beginning Special Education Professionals-Curriculum Concerns of New Teachers


Hoffengardner, Sandra, Teaching Exceptional Children


Special educators, whether they teach preschool, elementary, middle, or high school, have many curriculum concerns-particularly in today's climate of inclusion, standards-based reform, and high-stakes assessment. A primary task of special educators is to modify instructional strategies or curriculum slices so that students with disabilities can experience success and achieve their full potential. This being said, we must recognize that not all beginning teachers are equally prepared to teach each subject, grade level, or type of disability. Four years of college instruction, even under the best conditions, will not prepare someone who has had practicum experiences at the elementary level to teach high school math, for example.

To further our national understanding of how to provide the most appropriate guidance and support for new special educators, the Council for Exceptional Children implemented the Mentoring Induction Project (MIP) in 1998.1 During the first year, with the help of a national advisory board, we developed guidelines needed for a successful and effective mentoring program. In Year 2, we piloted these guidelines in Baldwin County, Alabama; Akron, Ohio; Las Vegas, Nevada; and Salt Lake City, Utah. This year we are proud to announce that along with these continuing sites, our new pilot sites for Year 3 are Little Rock, Arkansas; Pasco County (Tampa), Florida; Fulton County (Atlanta), Georgia; and Alexandria, Virginia.

One of the most pressing concerns voiced by our beginning professionals last year was "what do I teach, how do I teach it, and what materials do I have to teach it with?" Over the last year, MIP staff has interviewed over 100 beginning professional special educators. The comments that follow come from these conversations.

The General Education Curriculum

Most new teachers at our sites told us that their inservice sessions at the opening of school were valuable because they reviewed district curricular guidelines and expectations. Some described sitting in these sessions with copies of curriculum guides and scope and sequence charts all around them and becoming excited at the prospect of teaching all these things to their students. Many, however, admitted that they felt overwhelmed and somewhat frustrated with all this information given to them so early and so quickly.

One new teacher shared she felt that all that information was wasted on her at that time because she hadn't been given her class assignment yet and didn't even know at which grade level she would be teaching. Several others shared that they felt they had a good understanding of the curriculum and how to adapt it for their students-what they didn't have were any materials. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Mentoring Induction Projects: Supporting Beginning Special Education Professionals-Curriculum Concerns of New Teachers
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.