Medieval -- King Saint Stephen of Hungary by Gyorgy Gyorffy

By Kosztolnyik, Zoltan J. | The Catholic Historical Review, October 1995 | Go to article overview

Medieval -- King Saint Stephen of Hungary by Gyorgy Gyorffy


Kosztolnyik, Zoltan J., The Catholic Historical Review


King Saint Stephen of Hungary. By Gyoergy Gyoerffy.

Atlantic Studies on Society in Change, No. 71; East European Monographs, No. CCCCIII.

(Boulder, Colorado: Social Science Monographs; Highland Lakes, New Jersey: Atlantic Research and Publications, Inc. Distributed by Columbia University Press, New York. 1994. Pp. viii, 213. $32.00.)

The volume is an abbreviated version in English translation of the author's Istvan kiraly es mueve

King Stephen and his work

(Budapest: Gondolat, 1977 a book I have reviewed in Austrian History Yearbook, 17-18 (1981-82), 356-359. The English version does not, of course, offer the relatively rich picture and illustrative material included in the original, and it lacks the comprehensive bibliography of seventy-three pages in small print of the original. The latter is replaced by a barely ten-page list of books; and the double column index of fifty-six pages in small print of the original is substituted by a seventeen-page index of place and personal names. The list does not cite original primary sources individually, by name, except the Emericus Szentpetery (ed.), Scriptores rerum Hungaricarum (2 vols.; Budapest, 1937-38), collection--a critical edition of numerous narrative chronicles, and of the Admoniones of King St. Stephen (997-1038), addressed to his heirs on the throne. On the other hand, A. F. Gombos, Catalogus fontium historiae Hungaricae (4 vols.; Budapest, 1937-1941), is unacceptable as a reliable critical source collection. The existence and availability of Emericus Szentpetery and Ivan Borsa (eds.), Regesta regum stirpis Arpadianae critico-diplomatica (2 vols.; Budapest, 1923-1987), a rich trove of royal writs and diplomas, ought to have been at least acknowledged in the listings. What the latter renders is a relatively recent English translation of Hungarian laws, and Gyoergy Gyoerffy, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft der Ungarn um die Jahrtausendwende (Budapest, 1983), whose appendix (pp. …

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