Book Reviews -- Child Care in Russia: In Transition by Jean Ispa

By Edwards, Carolyn | Journal of Marriage and Family, November 1995 | Go to article overview

Book Reviews -- Child Care in Russia: In Transition by Jean Ispa


Edwards, Carolyn, Journal of Marriage and Family


Child Care in Russia: In Transition. Jean Ispa. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. 1994. 230 pp. Hardcover ISBN 0-89789-390-5. $55 cloth.

Jean Ispa first observed and studied Soviet child care centers in 1993-94 as part of her doctoral research on toddler social behavior. In 1991, just before demise of the Soviet Union, she returned to Russia for an intensive 3 months of research on current practices. Growing up in a household of Russian immigrants, she is fluent in the Russian language. Her knowledge of Russian language and culture, coupled with the long time horizon of her experience with American and Russian systems of education, render this new book a particularly enlightening, thoughtful, and balanced description of a system of child care outside our country.

Probably all Americans who lived through the Cold War possess many feelings and judgments, and facts and misfacts, about Soviet and Russian history and education. It is fascinating, therefore, to read the chapter titled "Some History" about the forces that have shaped Russian child care over the past two centuries and gain a picture of how changing societal priorities have shaped educational goals. The period from the Revolution of 1917 through the 1920s is portrayed as a time of experimentation and innovation, involving influx of certain North American and Western European progressive educational ideals. This time was followed by a more rigid and dogmatic period of Soviet control, with emphasis on socialization for collectivism, lasting until the 1960s. The most recent period, from the 1970s to the present, has en a resurgence of questioning, reform, and change, as part of the massive political and economic shifts sweeping the country. No doubt conditions have continued to change even since this book was written, as the breakup of the Soviet Union has meant many fewer central state resources for such services as health and education.

After establishing historical perspective, the author offers a few notes about the language and translation. The Russian teacher is called vospitanel'nitsa, one who brings up children or "upbringer," and teachers often show their fondness for children by using the diminutive form for nouns when speaking with children. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Book Reviews -- Child Care in Russia: In Transition by Jean Ispa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.