Fiery Feminists Ignite History

By Mitchell, Penni | Herizons, Fall 2003 | Go to article overview

Fiery Feminists Ignite History


Mitchell, Penni, Herizons


PADDLING HER OWN CANOE

The Times and Texts of E. Pauline Johnson, Tekahionwake by Veronica Strong-Boag and Carole Gerson

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO PRESS, 2000

Here's a nifty book. The best summation opens up Chapter Five: "From her birth in Six Nations in 1861 to her death in Vancouver in 1913, Pauline Johnson tested and expanded the meaning of Canada." Written by eminent feminist historian Veronica Strong-Boag and English professor Carole Gerson, this book about the Mohawk poet and performer is well written, detailed, alive and unafraid. Which is to say that its authors fully respect the contradictions that made `Canada's outstanding story-telling balladist' so interesting today. Perfect for biographiles.

WOMEN OF THE KLONDIKE

by Frances Backhouse

WHITECAP BOOKS, 1995

Not that we live for male approval at Herizons, but Pierre Burton's endorsement of a book on the Klondike does count for something, Even if you don't like the author's little red bow ties (Burton's that is), you'll enjoy reading this account of the wild and adventurous women who were struck with "Klondike fever, an affliction that was highly contagious and struck ndiscriminately." What was it like? A writer in an 1899 report in the Dawson Daily News lamented the opening of beauty parlors for women and lamented the passing of the "good old days of 96, 97 and 98 [when] the dance hall queen cared not so much for personal adornment, but rather prided herself on her staying powers for drink and revelry."

Yee-ha! Another picker-upper for the historically inclined.

COWGIRLS. BORN TO BE A COWGIRL

by Candace Savage

GREYSTONE BOOKS, 2001

The Wild West rules! …

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