American Forests 1995 Awards

American Forests, Winter 1996 | Go to article overview

American Forests 1995 Awards


Every year AMERICAN FORESTS recognizes individuals who have distinguished themselves in forestry and related natural-resource disciplines. AMERICAN FORESTS also presents urban forestry medals in cooperation with the National Urban Forest Council and the USDA Forest Service.

Distinguished Service Award

Given for distinguished service to forestry and other aspects of resource conservation.

Harold K. Steen joined the Forest History Society in 1969 and has been executive director since 1978. Prior to that, he was with the USDA Forest Service in Washington, DC, and the U.S. Forest and Range Experiment Station in Portland, OR. Steen is adjunct professor of history at Duke University, and adjunct professor of history at North Carolina University.

THE President's Award

Given to individuals or organizations for exemplary participation in and support of our activities.

Neil Sampson, AMERICAN FORESTS' senior fellow for science and policy, was the organization's executive vice president for 11 years. Under Sampson's leadership, AMERICAN FORESTS established the international Global ReLeaf campaign, which won the President's Environment and Conservation Citation award in 1991. He created the Forest Policy Center to further the protection and sustainable management of forest ecosystems. He chaired the congressionally established National Commission on Wildfire Disasters and was recognized for his work on forest health in the Inland West in 1994 by an Honor Award from the University of Idaho. A member of the Society of American Foresters, he is a Fellow of the Soil and Water Conservation Society and received its highest honor, the Hugh Hammond Bennett Award.

William B. Greeley Award

Given for major contributions to forest conservation in the area in which the recipient lives and works.

John Hibbard has been forester and executive director of the Connecticut Forest and Park Association for 33 years and has served on countless state committees and task forces. He provides continuity to the RC&D and Tree Farm programs and has chaired the Yankee and New England chapters of the Society of American Foresters.

John Aston Warder Medal

Named for our founder and presented to a member for long-term accomplishments in conserving forest resources and the environment, and serving AMERICAN FORESTS.

Susan Flader has been professor of American western and environmental history at the University of Missouri since 1973. She has been a visiting scholar at universities in China and Finland, and is currently at the University of the Western Cape in South Africa. She has served on the national boards of AMERICAN FORESTS, National Audubon Society, and Forest History Society, and is president of the American Society for Environmental History.

The Bernhard Eduard Fernow Award

Given with the German Forestry Association (Deutscher Forstverein) to individuals of any country for outstanding achievements in international forestry.

Daniel Botkin is president of the Center for the Study of the Environment, Santa Barbara, California, and director of the Program on Global Change at George Mason University. Formerly professor of biology and environmental studies at the University of California, Botkin has been active in applying ecological science to environmental management and is a leader in applying advanced technology to the study of the environment. …

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