It's the Law: N.J. Pharmacists to Be Paid for Diabetes Education

By Snyder, Karyn | Drug Topics, February 5, 1996 | Go to article overview

It's the Law: N.J. Pharmacists to Be Paid for Diabetes Education


Snyder, Karyn, Drug Topics


N.J. pharmacists to be paid for diabetes education

In New Jersey, Gov. Christine Todd Whitman has signed into law a bill requiring health insurers to provide coverage for diabetes self-management education, equipment, and supplies. This means that all certified diabetes educators (CDEs) and R.Ph.s who have successfully completed a boardapproved course on this subject will be paid for diabetes management services provided in the state. This legislation is significant because it makes New Jersey the first state in the nation to implement required payment to pharmacists for disease state management services.

The bill was originally introduced by the American Diabetes Association. After learning about it, the New Jersey Pharmacists Association (NJPhA) got involved and began working with the ADA to ensure that pharmacists formally trained in diabetes management would be reimbursed for their services. The NJPhA met with opposition early on, as some people within the N.J. pharmacy community felt that all pharmacists should be reimbursed for diabetes education, even if they were simply selling blood glucose monitors. However, members of NJPhA felt it was important to distinguish these specially trained pharmacists from others to ensure the quality of care and prevent abuse of the reimbursement system.

More training needed

"We've had pharmacists out there doing this pro bono for several years who really know what they are doing and have really good practices. Those are the people who need to be compensated. At this time, I would say that there are only about 30 pharmacists in the state who can be compensated according to the guidelines in the bill. We hope that more and more pharmacists will go in for additional training to provide these services," said Debbie Nichol, director of professional and educational affairs for NJPhA.

Though many are happy that R.Ph.s don't have to complete the 2,000-hour CDE course and examination to qualify, they are still fearful that the qualifications imposed by the bill could lead to a system of certification, which would then create two classes of pharmacists.

"To become an expert in anything, you have to upgrade your professional expertise in these areas," said Steve Brandt, executive director of the Garden State Pharmacy Owners. "There's no doubt about that, and I'm in favor of that, but I'm not so sure that certification is the answer. Even though it sounds great, it could establish two classes of pharmacists[Pharmacy] doesn't need any more division."

The new law in New Jersey does not require certification but does require R.Ph.s to take a board-approved course in diabetes education and management. Temple University School of Pharmacy and Philadelphia College of Pharmacy & Science have been working with each other to offer an ADA-approved program in diabetes education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

It's the Law: N.J. Pharmacists to Be Paid for Diabetes Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.