Fluxkids (Overview)

By Higgins, Hannah | Visible Language, September 1, 2005 | Go to article overview

Fluxkids (Overview)


Higgins, Hannah, Visible Language


Abstract

"Fluxkids" is a group name that evolved among a particular group of the children of Fluxus artists in and around New York in the 1960s and 1970s. The Fluxkids lived Fluxus in a way unlike anyone else has ever done-they grew up together backstage and in the concert halls of Fluxus performances and at Fluxus exhibitions, as well as at other venues such as Charlotte Moorman's Annual New York Festiwal of the Avant-Garde. The texts in this article represent a group portrait of the "Fluxkids." Assembled by Hannah Higgins, many of the Fluxkids contributed to this collection. It presents their unique view of Fluxus activities and offers a group portrait of Fluxus as the children of the New York Fluxus artists experienced it. The mutual context of growing-up Fluxus means that they shared similar experiences. As different people from different families, much is unique to each of them and each voice has its own place in this collection.

THE FIRST TIME I CAME ACROSS Fluxus in the classroom, I was at Oberlin College in Ohio. The work was described as an extremely far out version of ultra sixties' sex art and political radicalism As the daughter ofFluxus artists Dick Higgins and Alison Knowles, I was shocked-shocked because what I was learning bore virtually no resemblance to my life and because my life bore virtually no resemblance to this description. Now lama historian ofFluxus at the University of Illinois, Chicago, so I guess you could say I have spent the next twenty years trying to make sense of that moment. I think I have in some sort of scholarly way, although there remains personal work to do. The following accounts of Fluxkids growing up around Fluxus in New York do far more than any academic account I can: muster up. These are personal histories conjoined to, even built upon, Fluxus foundations. Perhaps I should say New York Fluxus foundations, as many, many Fluxkids from around the world could not be included... yet. This project has legs, though. I'm sure at another place and time, there will be an even fuller accounting. Thanks go to them all, included or not, for we have all shared in something rather unique (I think) in art history and personal history as well.

Bibbi Hansen

DUE TO A LONG AND UGLY CUSTODY BATTLE BETWEEN MY MOTHER AND my father back when I was a toddler, I was rarely allowed to see Al until I was about ten years old and self-reliant enough to sneak off on my own to meet him in coffee shops and movie theaters. One of my favorite regular outings back then was with a group of Al's friends who had gathered together in a loosely-organized group called "The Anonymous Arts Recovery Society." They would meet weekend mornings throughout the year to rescue unique architectural and decorative elements from old buildings that were slated to be demolished. After the building was torn down, these pieces would then be carted off to a deserted yard behind the Brookyn Museum where the administration had agreed to store the stuff indefinitely. Without the efforts of the Anonymous Arts Recovery Society and the Brooklyn Museum, many wonderful historic pieces of building art would have been smashed and destroyed.

I remember my father and art dealer Ivan Karp going to the superintendent of a condemned building and asking about the demolition plans because they wanted the "heads" from the building. The super hadn't the foggiest what they were talking about. They coaxed him outside to look and pointed out all the precious and fantastic pieces attached to his building. Amazed, he called to his wife and kids to come look! They'd been living in the building forty-two years and had never once noticed the nightmarish man-animals, gargoyles and demons plastered all over the edifice of their home.

Wherever I went from then on, I always stopped and took time to "look" and to "see." I was soon able to easily pick out the patterns like "eggs and arrows" and delighted in the random odd fierce creatures discovered on cornices and keystones. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fluxkids (Overview)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.