Middle Management Stress

By Johnson, Robert Roy | Law & Order, October 2005 | Go to article overview

Middle Management Stress


Johnson, Robert Roy, Law & Order


Stress is the law enforcement officer's constant companion. Most departments have procedures in place to effectively manage stress within the workforce. Much of this responsibility falls to the sergeants. As a result, though, the stress experienced by these middle managers themselves is often overlooked.

Middle managers are no longer responsible for only themselves. They are responsible for each and every police officer that they supervise as well. This is stress compounded with the stress typical to any police officer's experience. For upper management, the stressed out supervisor can adversely impact officers and department goals. Consequently, chiefs, deputy chiefs, and captains must recognize and address the two sources of stress in their supervisors.

First, inherent to the sergeant's rank, there is stress over that which upper management has no control. For instance, as noted, responsibility for others is a stressor. Now, upper management cannot be expected to remove responsibility as a stressor. However, chiefs and captains can mitigate the impact of stress. They must be accessible to their line supervisors. Call those sergeants in for a chat. By all means, offer advice. Remember, while in most relationships unsolicited advice is frowned upon, as a top level supervisor, you are obliged to advise. Be familiar with and direct the supervisor to stress management programs.

As well, chiefs and captains should research stress reduction techniques on their own. There is a wealth of information on the Internet. You do not have to be a professional to recommend well known methods for stress reduction, such as exercise or meditation. Know your people. What might work for one sergeant might not necessarily be appropriate for another. And, while your suggestions may go unheeded, just knowing the captain or chief cares enough to offer input might alleviate some of that stress.

Hone those listening skills as well. Provide the opportunity for a sergeant to unburden to a higher ranking officer. An upper management supervisor should be able to commiserate with a middle manager. After all, they have been there. The captain can share experiences, or, at the very least, empathize and sympathize. The chief is in a position to offer succor and encouragement. A kind word after a healthy venting can go a long way towards easing stress. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Middle Management Stress
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.