Chronology: Iraq

The Middle East Journal, Autumn 2005 | Go to article overview

Chronology: Iraq


See also Regional Affairs, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey

Apr. 16: In the central Iraqi town of Madain, Sunni militants took about 70 Shi'ite males hostage and threatened to kill them unless all Shi'ites left the town. [AP, 4/16]

Apr. 18: The Baghdad City Council overwhelmingly endorsed 'Ala' Mahmud Tamimi, a 52-year-old structural engineer, to become Mayor of Baghdad. A native of Fallujah who holds a doctorate from the University of Paris, Tamimi would oversee a $75 million budget and 9,000 municipal employees. The endorsement awaited approval from L. Paul Bremer, the US administrator of Iraq. [WP, 4/18]

Apr. 20: The bodies of over 50 people were recovered from the Tigris River south of Baghdad. Iraqi authorities did not release the identities of the men, women, and children killed and said it was unclear whether the bodies were related to the Shi'ite hostages taken in Madain several days before. Meanwhile, residents found the bullet-ridden bodies of 19 Iraqi men in a soccer stadium in Haditha, a town 140 miles north of Baghdad. [The Guardian, 4/20]

Apr. 21: Insurgents, using a rocket propelled grenade, shot down a commercial helicopter chartered by the US Defense Department. Eleven people aboard, including six American military contractors, were killed. The downing occurred near the town of Tarmiya, 25 miles north of Baghdad. [The Guardian, 4/22]

Apr. 22: A car bomb exploded outside a Shi'ite mosque in Baghdad, killing at least nine people and wounding more than 20. The blast occurred during Friday prayers at the al-Subeih mosque in eastern Baghdad. [BBC, 4/22]

Apr. 24: At least 16 people were killed in twin bombings near the AhI al-Bayt mosque in Shula, in northern Baghdad. The blasts came hours after a similar double bombing of a police academy in Tikrit in northern Iraq, which killed at least six people and wounded 33. [BBC, 4/25]

Apr. 25: In an addendum to the Iraq Survey Group report issued in October, US chief weapons inspector, Charles Duelfer, said investigations into weapons of mass destruction in Iraq would cease. The addendum recommended that detainees held in connection with the investigation be released, and concluded that there was no evidence that Saddam Husayn sent weapons to Syria for safekeeping. [4/26, RFE]

Apr. 26: Prime Minister designate Ibrahim al-Ja'fari presented his list of proposed ministers to Iraqi presidential designate Jalal Talibani. The list of ministers included 17 Shi'ites, eight Kurds and six Sunnis. Former interim Prime Minister 'Iyad 'Allawi's United Iraqi Coalition was left off the list. [AN, 4/27]

Apr. 27: Lamia 'Abd Khadawi, a member of the Iraqi Parliament, was shot dead in front of her house in the al-Bonouk quarter of Baghdad. Khadawi, a member of former Prime Minister 'Iyad 'Allawi's coalition, was the first MP killed since elections at the end of January. [AN, 4/28]

Apr. 28: Members of Parliament partially approved a new cabinet by a large majority despite failure to agree on seven top posts, including ministers of oil and defense. Among the names on the new list was Shi'ite politician Ahmad Chalabi, who would temporarily act as oil minister and take one of the deputy prime minister's posts. All posts were required to be filled by May 7, the deadline set for forming the government. [BBC, 4/28]

Apr. 29: Four suicide car bombs exploded in the 'Azzamiyya area of Baghdad killing at least 20 and injuring upwards of 60. The attacks were focused on Iraqi police and interior ministry headquarters. [The Guardian, 4/29]

May 3: The new Iraqi government of Prime Minister Ibrahim al-Ja'fari was sworn in. The swearing in marks the start of the first democratically elected government since the fall of Saddam Husayn. Five ministries - including the key defense and oil portfolios - remained in temporary hands and two deputy prime minister's slots were still unfilled. Ja'fari had wanted the defense minister's job filled by a Sunni as a way to draw the formerly dominant minority into the fight against the primarily Sunni insurgency. …

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