IRAN: The Iranian Labyrinth: Journeys through Theocratic Iran and Its Furies

By Samii, Abbas William | The Middle East Journal, Autumn 2005 | Go to article overview

IRAN: The Iranian Labyrinth: Journeys through Theocratic Iran and Its Furies


Samii, Abbas William, The Middle East Journal


IRAN The Iranian Labyrinth: Journeys Through Theocratic Iran and Its Furies, by Dilip Hiro. New York: Nation Books, 2005. xxxiv + 372 pages. Notes to p. 392. Gloss to p. 404. Sel. bibl. to p. 406. $16.95.

Dilip Hiro is a prolific writer. In addition to his journalism for The New Statesman, Observer, Guardian, and other news publications, he has authored or coauthored more than 20 books. The Iranian Labyrinth appears to be his second book focusing on Iran, the other being Iran Under the Ayatollahs; he has written books on the Iran-Iraq War and on Iran-Iraq relations as well.

The chapters in The Iranian Labyrinth are organized around subjects that are influential in Iranian affairs regardless of monarchical or clerical leadership (e.g., the bazaar, the parliament, oil, young people, and women, as well as Qom and the clergy). However, the chapters do not really fulfill their promise. The book notes the importance of the bazaar and touches on its role in the 1979 revolution, for example, but it does not delve very deeply into the current relationship between this powerful commercial institution and the government. The author's interviews with merchants could have been opportunities to obtain their impressions about accession to the World Trade Organization and the possibility of Iran becoming more fully integrated with the global marketplace. Moreover, what is the relationship between older, more traditional merchants affiliated with institutions like the Islamic Coalition Party (Hezb-e Motalefeh-ye lslami) and the new generation of political conservatives affiliated with the Islamic Iran Developers Coalition (Etelqf-i Abadgaran-i Iran-i lslami)! The chapter on the holy city of Qom contains some interesting points, too, but it would be helpful to compare the city's relatively politicized atmosphere with that of Mashhad, the more apolitical site of the tomb of Imam Reza. Does this have any implications for the future of the Islamic republic? Will the revival of Najaf have an impact?

Unfortunately, much of the information in this book is available elsewhere, and the inclusion of this information adds little to this book. The chapter on Prime Minister Muhammad Mussadiq, for example, contains a chronology of the July-August 1953 events that culminated in his overthrow. Moreover, the author notes the difficulty in visiting Mussadiq's home in Ahmadabad because nobody seems to know where it actually is. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

IRAN: The Iranian Labyrinth: Journeys through Theocratic Iran and Its Furies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.