Reflecting on Katrina

By Lima, Marybeth | ASEE Prism, November 2005 | Go to article overview

Reflecting on Katrina


Lima, Marybeth, ASEE Prism


Engineers must engage the community in addressing disenfranchisement.

THE SKY GETS HIGHER in September. A fellow graduate student taught me that proverb, which she translated from her native Korean. I've always loved that statement, and I feel like it's true. As I write this essay on my back porch in mid-September, the Louisiana sky is so high and so blue it's amazing. Still, Katrina is very much on my mind, and there's one thought I keep returning to.

I have known for years that if a Category 5 hurricane ever hit New Orleans, predictions were that 100,000 people would die. I learned a year ago that 130,000 people in New Orleans have no personal transportation and would constitute the vast majority of the 100,000 casualties. I accepted the latter statement as truth but didn't think to do anything about it. My lack of thought on this issue bothers me.

I've spent my professional life committed to service-learning in engineering. Service-learning is defined as an educational experience where students participate in an activity that meets community needs and helps students gain further understanding of course content, a broader appreciation of the discipline and an enhanced sense of civic responsibility. For the past six years, I've worked with children in public schools in Baton Rouge and college students at Louisiana State University to design and construct dream playgrounds at public schools. We're on the way to making this happen throughout the city, and I'm currently on sabbatical trying to make this effort a reality statewide. I've been so committed to this endeavor that I became almost myopic about other issues. Katrina jolted me back to reality.

The effects of Katrina are mindboggling to me personally and professionally. The engineer in me is still critiquing inefficiencies in the collection, distribution and use of rescue efforts and resources, while the humanist in me is aghast at the tragedy and the vast differences in race, class and life in America that the hurricane exposed. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reflecting on Katrina
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.