Letters


Pharma Cartoon

To Aging Today:

I feel compelled to comment on this as a geriatric nurse practitioner. I read the July-August 2004 Aging Today and noted that you have a rather negative cartoon re pharmaceuticals and cost of meds on page 3. And on page 4 you have a thank-you to benefactors, many of whom are pharmaceutical companies. Personally, I feel this is a slap in the face to such companies who support us in our work to improve care to older adults. I do work with pharmaceuticals, and for me it is a pleasure to help companies understand the drug-patient-provider issues that occur. If it wasn't for pharmaceuticals we could not provide the type of care we do, or do the educational programs we do. I am not a pharm rep, nor have I ever worked for a drug company. These are my own personal opinions.

Barbara Resnick

University of Maryland

School of Nursing

Columbia, Md.

Peacemakers

To Aging Today:

I loved your "meaty" issue of Aging Today (July-August 2004). It was, however, Peter Drucker's quote [in "A Tale of Two Futures From a Man, Age 122," about the presentation by Harry R. Moody], which prompted me to write. Namely, he quoted Drucker as saying, "The best way to predict the future is to create it."

Having received my doctorate four years ago at Nova Southeastern University, Fort Lauderdale, FIa., in conflict resolution and international peace studies-I'm now age 85-I have organized the Institute of Peacemaking Elders. Our primary efforts have been directed toward understanding the richness of other cultures and what the elders in those societies can teach us. (Tibetan monks believe that a single conversation with a wise man is better than 10 years of study. …

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