Reed between the Lines

By Amoruso, Susan | Dance Teacher, December 2001 | Go to article overview

Reed between the Lines


Amoruso, Susan, Dance Teacher


The buzz around campus about Janet Reed, an assistant professor of dance at Buffalo State College in New York, is that dancers enrolled in her high-energy classes must be prepared to work hard, sweat and even be sore the next day. From the minute students enter the studio, Reed demands complete dedication. In return, she offers a total commitment to teaching. "If students have gotten as far as the door, that means they want it, so I try to give them all I've got," she says.

Reed comes to the classroom with extensive professional achievements and life experiences that have shaped the teacher and artist she is today. She has created various workshops and programs for institutions including the Arts Institute of Western New York and the African American Cultural Center, and has earned a teaching degree in physical education at the State University of New York at Brockport and a master's in theater and dance at SUNY Buffalo. Her unique choreography, infused with ballet, modern, jazz and African dance, has secured her recognition from the New York State Council on the Arts, the Arts Council of Buffalo and the Barbara Deming Memorial Fund for Women. Reed is the artistic director both of the Buffalo City Ballet, which introduces inner city youth to ballet, and of her more than 10-yearold African-contemporary troupe, Janet Reed and Dancers.

Like many of her students, Reed struggled with the decision of whether to attend college or go professional and came to terms with physical attributes that precluded a career in ballet. Reed shares her past in her classes and tries to equip the more experienced dancers with the knowledge necessary to overcome the obstacles involved in pursuing a career as a choreographer, dancer, teacher or artistic director. "I tell students that to be serious about dance you have to do it every day, for at least two to four hours a day," she says. "If you really, really want to perform, it's six hours a day."

The serious students are not her only focus, however. Reed welcomes undergraduates who minor in the artform, taking class for recreation and to connect with their bodies. Beginner dancers learn the importance of class etiquette, spatial awareness and endurance. They may even discover a latent talent, explains Reed. "I've learned early on not to discourage anyone," she says. "It's very unfair when teachers walk in and say, `Oh, she'll never be a dancer, look at the body.' Accept her body and find her passion. You have to take time to nurture students."

Reed teaches two 120-minute classes per semester that can range from beginner ballet to modern to African diaspora technique. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reed between the Lines
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.