STORM OF STEEL: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union

By Stephenson, Scott | Military Review, September/October 2005 | Go to article overview

STORM OF STEEL: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union


Stephenson, Scott, Military Review


STORM OF STEEL: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union, Mary R. Habeck, Cornell University Press, Ithaca and London, 2003, 309 pages, $36.50.

For officers who find the current period of transformation perplexing, the period between the world wars offers a potentially rich source of context and inspiration. Between 1914 and 1918, World War I battlefields suggested potential use for the tank, the airplane, the submarine, and the radio. What remained to be seen was who could best exploit that potential-who would "get it right," to use Sir Michael Howard's famous phrase.

Author Mary R. Habeck argues that when it came to the tank's battlefield possibilities, the Soviet Union and Nazi Germany got it right. By 1936, both had developed effective doctrine for using armored forces in battles of maneuver. Storm of Steel compares the way these doctrines emerged in the Soviet and German armies. The book is a work of exemplary scholarship as Habeck uses her impressive linguistic and analytical skills to exploit German and Soviet archives. She demonstrates how the Reichswehr and the Soviet Army overcame serious obstacles to develop an effective conceptual basis for the use of mechanized forces.

Panzer buffs should beware. This book is not about weapons and technology; it is about ideas. Habeck shows how armored doctrine evolved as competing factions bounced concepts and arguments off each other. Early Soviet tank advocates had to overcome the Bolshevik celebration of the mass proletarian army. German Army mechanized warfare proponents had to outlast the horse cavalry's last true believers. Intellectual resistance, however, was far from the only obstacle to change. The Germans had to emphasize conceptual development because the restrictions of the Versailles Treaty limited technological innovation. In the same fashion, early Soviet innovation was handicapped by an inadequate industrial base. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

STORM OF STEEL: The Development of Armor Doctrine in Germany and the Soviet Union
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.