Book Review: The New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, Foundation for a Profession

By Craig, James L., Jr. | The CPA Journal, April 1996 | Go to article overview

Book Review: The New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, Foundation for a Profession


Craig, James L., Jr., The CPA Journal


This volume presents a compilation of the historical articles published between 1949 and 1972 in The New York Certified Public Accountant, the predecessor magazine to The CPA Journal. The publication of this collection is particularly appropriate at this time because of the 100th anniversary of the first CPA licensing law in the United States, which was enacted in New York.

The goal of editor Julia Grant was to reproduce the articles in a manner similar to the original publication and to retain the sense of language and usage. The articles are grouped by topic areas of professional history, educational history, history of the New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, and individual biographies.

The collection of articles make fascinating reading.

Readers are free to pick and choose the area that interests them the most. The very first article on the early development of the profession contains a quote from Charles Waldo Haskins at the time of the founding of the New York University School of Commerce, Accounts and Finance. Haskins became dean of the school and a professor of the history of accountancy. Haskins is quoted as saying: No attempt will be made in the school to foster the notion that commerce or accountancy is a royal road to wealth, or to leisure, or to unmerited social position; but in addition to the intellectual qualifications of talent for observation, power of perception, patience of investigation, presence of mind, judgment, reflection, order and method, aptitude for calculation, abstraction memory, mental activity, and steadiness, which is hoped the student will possess in some fair degree, the moral virtues of honesty, candor, firmness, Prudence, truth, justice, economy, temperance, liberality, politeness, good temper, self control, and perseverance will be inculcated as necessary to his own personal welfare an the stability of the business world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Book Review: The New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, Foundation for a Profession
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.