The Letters of Leadership

By Kaiser, Donna | Montessori Life, Fall 2005 | Go to article overview

The Letters of Leadership


Kaiser, Donna, Montessori Life


L| is for love and light-love what you are doing and you will light a spark that will kindle a love of learning in each of your students

E| is for enthusiasm and excitement-smile, laugh, and share with your students the joy of learning

A| is for age-appropriate-lead each child at his or her own level of learning

D| is for direction-know where each child came from and where he or she is going

E| is for energy-take care of iyourself and your energy so you can better take care of your students

R| is for rights, rules, and respect-you cannot have one without the other two

S| is for spirit and support-hold the spirit of Maria in your heart and support your peers

H| is for honesty-stand back once in a while and ask yourself what is working and what isn't

I| is for impact-in some way and at some time we will have an impact on each of our students; make it a positive one

P| is for patience-with ourselves, with others, and with our students

School is in full swing now so I imagine that, like myself, most of you are immersed in "leading" your students. Normalization may seem a long way off for some of us but hang in there-we've all done this before!

Just when you think you are drowning in paperwork and questions of how to and when, your American Montessori Society comes to the rescue! The 20th Annual Touring Symposia will be offering two really exciting and relevant workshops.

Joanne DeFilipp Alex will present "Maria Montessori & Best Practices: Are We Just Catching Up with Her?" By the time this issue goes to print, Joanne will have presented in Arlington, TX, Toledo, OH, and Rochester, NY. She'll also be presenting on January 21, 2006 in Rockford, IL. For those of you who were able to attend one of the first three sessions, I hope you enjoyed the symposium, and for those of you who can make it to the January presentation, I know you will love Joanne's enthusiasm and realistic look at Montessori and the buzzword of the day, "best practices. …

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