Congress to Vote on Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills

Army, January 2006 | Go to article overview

Congress to Vote on Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills


As we went to press, the U.S. Senate had still not voted on the $491.6 billion fiscal year 2006 Defense Authorization bill because of the fight over Sen. John McCain's (R-AZ) amendment specifying the treatment of prisoners of war. The Senate had earlier hoped to pass the bill before its Thanksgiving break but failed.

The White House had threatened to veto the Defense Authorization bill and the Defense Appropriations bill unless McCain's amendment was removed, but has since lightened its stance and is negotiating with McCain on changing the amendment's language. McCain, however, has said, "We have not made progress." Other senators have agreed with McCain on the lack of progress but Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist (R-TN) claimed on December 10 that he thought "an agreement will be reached."

McCain's amendment calls for banning cruel, inhumane and degrading treatment of prisoners of war and making the U.S. Army's field manual the standard for all American interrogators no matter what their service or agency. McCain himself was tortured when he was a prisoner during the Vietnam War.

The U.S. House of Representatives has a similar budget bill, but without McCain's amendment. The Senate Armed Services Committee tentatively planned for the House to vote on its bill on December 14, with the Senate voting on its version the next day.

President Presents Plan for Victory. Calling for nothing less than complete victory, President George W. Bush addressed an audience of midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., telling the nation that "by fighting these terrorists in Iraq, Americans in uniform are defeating a direct threat to the American people."

The President went on to explain his administration's national strategy for victory in Iraq. As the President spoke, the White House released a 38-page report, covering the benefits of victory and the consequences of failure.

The President called for a continuance of isolating the enemy, clearing and holding areas, restoring and reforming Iraq's infrastructure and economy and building the country's security forces and national institutions. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Congress to Vote on Defense Authorization and Appropriations Bills
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.