The Department of Education Battle, 1918-1932: Public Schools, Catholic Schools, and the Social Order

By Shelley, Thomas J. | The Catholic Historical Review, October 2005 | Go to article overview

The Department of Education Battle, 1918-1932: Public Schools, Catholic Schools, and the Social Order


Shelley, Thomas J., The Catholic Historical Review


The Department of Education Battle, 1918-1932: Public Schools, Catholic Schools, and the Social Order. By Douglas J. Slawson. (Notre Dame, Indiana: University of Notre Dame Press. 2005. Pp. xvi, 332. $43.00.)

One of the primary reasons for establishing the National Catholic Welfare Council in 1919 was to give the Catholic Church a national organization comparable to the Protestant Federal Council of Churches. However, as Douglas J. Slawson demonstrates, during the first decade of its existence, the main rival to the NCWC was not the Federal Council of Churches, but the National Education Association. At issue was the attempt of the NEA to lobby for the establishment of a federal Department of Education and federal aid to education, both of which were opposed by Catholic educators. Beginning in 1919 with the SmithTowner Bill, the NEA and its allies worked hard to secure congressional approval for these initiatives, but abandoned the attempt in 1932. The adroit lobbying tactics of the NCWC was a major reason for their failure.

Catholic opposition was rooted in the fear that a federal Department of Education would lead to a "Prussianization" of American education and that federal aid to public schools would price most private and Catholic schools out of the market. Catholic suspicion was intensified by the fact that two of the most prominent organizations to support a Department of Education were the Southern Jurisdiction of the Scottish Rite Masons and the Ku Klux Klan, whose ultimate purpose was to outlaw all private elementary and secondary education, as they tried to do in Oregon in 1922.

Catholics were not alone in their opposition. The educational establishment itself was divided, especially over federal aid to education, fearful that federal money would lead to federal control of education. Moreover, the proposed legislation offended the principle of states rights and local control of education. Most significant of all perhaps was that the Republican administrations that controlled the federal government from 1921 to 1932 were all committed to trimming the federal budget and showed no enthusiasm for additional educational expenditures.

Douglas J. Slawson has mined the archives of the NCWC to provide a detailed account of the way that the U.S. bishops responded to what they perceived as a major threat to Catholic education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Department of Education Battle, 1918-1932: Public Schools, Catholic Schools, and the Social Order
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.