Parents and Mathematics Education in a Latino Community: Redefining Parental Participation

By Civil, Marta; Bratton, Jill et al. | Multicultural Education, Winter 2005 | Go to article overview

Parents and Mathematics Education in a Latino Community: Redefining Parental Participation


Civil, Marta, Bratton, Jill, Quintos, Beatriz, Multicultural Education


Introduction

Rhonda: The good thing about MAPPS is that it [opens] our awareness in math, you know the workshops, it just opens up the doors that we thought that were closed specially for me....I think that it is important that I learned that, our kids aren't really being taught what they are supposed to be taught and that's one big thing and that parents have a lot of power that we don't know that we have it, that's what MAPPS taught me.

Our work aims to expand the vision of parent1 participation in school mathematics, in particular the role of mothers from diverse ethnocultural and low socioeconomic groups. The experience of some of the mothers has led them to believe, as in the above quote, that their role is limited and that their ability to voice their opinions and concerns is hampered by the traditional school structure.

Through their involvement in MAPPS2 (Math and Parent Partnerships in the Southwest), parents like Rhonda have had experiences that took them through a series of processes that provide us with a different vision for parental participation in mathematics education. This vision is the focus of our article.

The vision consists of four components: Parents as Parents (i.e., parents originally joined MAPPS because they want to help their children with their mathematics education); Parents as Learners (parents become learners for themselves; some even pursue further education); Parents as Teachers (this is a unique feature-parents become facilitators of mathematics workshops for other parents in the community); Parents as Leaders (e.g., parents become advocates for the education of not only their children but for all the children in the district).

This article elaborates on these components based on the parents' own reflections.

Theoretical Framework

Our work with adults in mathematics draws from three bodies of research. The first one is grounded on socio-cultural theory and in particular on the concept of "funds of knowledge" through which households and communities are seen as having knowledge and resources that can be tapped into for educational purposes (González, 1995; Moll, 1992).

The second body of research combines ethnomathematics and adult education grounded on critical pedagogy (Benn, 1997; Flecha, 2000; Knijnik, 1993). Finally, we draw on research on parental involvement, in particular that which critically examines issues of power and perceptions of parents (especially language and ethnic "minority" and working-class parents) (Delgado Gaitan, 2001; Henry, 1996; Lareau, 2000).

Our approach to parents and mathematics education is grounded on the concept of parents as intellectual resources (Civil & Andrade, 2003), which means that we are particularly interested in parents' views and understandings of mathematics and that we seek to learn from them and to build our mathematics instruction on these adults' knowledge and experiences. This is consistent with approaches to parent participation that are largely based on facilitating parents in their empowerment process so that they can effect change, work to challenge the rhetoric of parent involvement, and work to build community action (Delgado Gaitan, 2001).

We focus on the strengths and assets of the families and communities with which we work in order to change the focus from needs of the communities to the possibilities present within the communities (Guajardo & Guajardo, 2002).

Context

The focus of MAPPS is on engaging parents in mathematics through three different types of activities: (1) Mathematics Awareness Workshops (MAWS), which are open to all the parents (and their children) in the school district and range over key topics in K-12 mathematics (e.g., multiplication, misconceptions about the equal sign, exploring patterns, proportional reasoning). These workshops are self-contained and last about two hours.

(2) Leadership development sessions in which parents, teachers, and administrators learn how to facilitate workshops (MAWS) for the larger parent community and participate in team building activities. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Parents and Mathematics Education in a Latino Community: Redefining Parental Participation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.