Nurse-Patient Interaction Opens Hospitals to Liability

By Ruiz, Gina | Workforce Management, January 3, 2006 | Go to article overview

Nurse-Patient Interaction Opens Hospitals to Liability


Ruiz, Gina, Workforce Management


THIRD-PARTY HARASSMENT

Few settings present as great a challenge for protecting workers against sexual harassment as hospitals. Each day, nurses come into close physical contact with dozens of virtual strangers their patients-who aren't employees of the hospital and who haven't gone through a vetting process. It is difficult to predict how patients are going to treat nurses, and it is impossible for hospitals to enforce anything like an employer's code of conduct on them.

This lack of control, however, doesn't immunize hospitals against the actions of a nonemployee, says Jim Hall, partner at Barlow, Kobata & Denis, an employment law firm based in Los Angeles. The law is clear: An organization is liable for the behavior of a third party if it knows -or should know based on experience -of improper conduct and fails to take immediate corrective action.

This legal precedent has been reinforced time and again. Most recently, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago found a hospital liable for the sexual harassment of a nurse by a doctor who was not a hospital employee.

One way for hospitals to protect themselves is by educating and coaching employees. Hospitals may not be able to control how patients interact with nurses, but they can try to manage how nurses react in the face of sexual aggravation, says Debbie S. Dougherty, assistant professor of organizational communications at the University of Missouri, Columbia.

Dougherty is a proponent of what she calls "coffee chat training." It entails having experienced nurses sit with novices in a casual environment to talk about their experiences with sexual harassment in the workplace. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nurse-Patient Interaction Opens Hospitals to Liability
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.