The Certified Public Manager Program: Introduction

By Balanoff, Howard; Schachter, Hindy Lauer | Public Administration Quarterly, Fall/Winter 2004 | Go to article overview

The Certified Public Manager Program: Introduction


Balanoff, Howard, Schachter, Hindy Lauer, Public Administration Quarterly


INTRODUCTION

The type of training and development we offer public administrators tells a lot about the kind of public administration we want. Two basic questions emerge in discussing administrative development: How should we structure programs, e.g., what relationship should they have with universities or public agencies, what prerequisites should they require, should they lead to certification, etc.? What skills should programs develop-what do graduates need to know?

While a number of articles discuss the skills public managers need and relate them to program structure, most such analyses limit their purview to master of public administration programs. Only a few articles have analyzed the history or operation of certified public manager (CPM) programs. As Hays and Duke (1996, p. 425) note CPM "has not commanded nearly as much attention as other concerns relating to the professionalization of the field."

The American Society for Public administration's Section for Professional and Organizational Development (SPOD) is pleased to sponsor a symposium to extend the discussion of administrative development to CPM offerings. The intent is both to illuminate this aspect of the development universe and to open discussion on possible relationships between CPM programs and MPAs.

The symposium consists of six articles. Thomas Patterson and Kenneth Henning's opening piece describes the birth of the CPM concept and identifies the major management concerns that led to the program's creation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The Certified Public Manager Program: Introduction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.