Today in History - March 17

The Canadian Press, March 3, 2017 | Go to article overview

Today in History - March 17


Today in History - March 17

--

Today in History for March 17:

On this date:

In 461, tradition says St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, died.

In 1233, millions of mice invaded the area of Freising, Germany, forcing the evacuation of entire towns.

In 1765, St. Patrick's Day was celebrated for the first time in Canada, in Quebec City.

In 1776, British forces left Boston for Halifax after American troops seized Dorchester Heights in a night attack.

In 1810, the first issue of the Kingston News was published.

In 1845, the Geological Survey of Canada was established.

In 1865, the federal government approved an unprecedented defence budget of $1 million.

In 1866, the U.S. government ended reciprocal tariff concessions for Canadian trade, a month after Canadian fishing concessions to Americans ended. The move helped swing opinion in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia in favour of Confederation. Canadian politicians tried unsuccessfully throughout the rest of the 19th century to restore reciprocity.

In 1906, U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt first likened crusading journalists to a man with "the muckrake in his hand" in a speech to the Gridiron Club in Washington.

In 1938, Rudolf Nureyev, the ballet dancer and choreographer who defected to the west in 1961, was born in Russia. His partnership with Margot Fonteyn at Covent Garden was an enormous success. He died in Paris of AIDS on Jan. 6, 1993.

In 1942, U.S. General Douglas MacArthur reached Australia to lead Allied forces in the southwest Pacific during the Second World War. He'd been ordered to flee the Philippines on a harrowing boat trip just before its capture by Japan. On March 20th at Terowie, South Australia, MacArthur made his famous speech in which he said "I came out of Bataan and I shall return."

In 1943, the price of wheat reached $1 a bushel for the first time since 1938.

In 1944, the International Air Transport Authority was created to regulate air traffic among nations.

In 1955, the "Richard Riot" broke out in the Montreal Forum. Canadiens fans were enraged that NHL president Clarence Campbell suspended star forward Maurice Richard for the remainder of the regular season and the playoffs for a stick-swinging incident with a Boston player and an assault on a linesman. When Campbell appeared at the Habs' game versus Detroit, fans threw tomatoes and set off tear gas. After the game was suspended after one period and the Red Wings awarded a 4-1 win, the mob moved outside to overturn cars and loot stores for the next four hours. Without Richard, the Canadiens lost the Stanley Cup to Detroit.

In 1966, the "Gemini 8" capsule, with astronauts Neil Armstrong and Dave Scott aboard, began to spin violently. It made an emergency landing in the Pacific.

In 1967, for the first time in Canadian history, a special Commons-Senate committee recommended the removal of a federally appointed judge. The committee said Justice Leo Landreville should be removed from the Ontario Supreme Court for misconduct. He was accused of compromising his judicial functions by accepting shares in a natural gas company. Maintaining his innocence, Landreville resigned on June 7. In 1977, a Federal Court invalidated the committee's report, ruling that Landreville was not given an opportunity to refute the charges.

In 1969, Golda Meir was sworn in as Israel's first woman prime minister. She served until 1974.

In 1978, Toronto Sun publisher Douglas Creighton and editor Peter Worthington were charged with violating the Official Secrets Act for publishing information from a top-secret RCMP report on Soviet espionage activities in Canada.

In 1978, the oil tanker "Amoco Cadiz" ran aground on the coast of Brittany, France. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Today in History - March 17
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.