Dambrot Charged with Reviving Dukes; LeBron James Took to Twitter on Sunday to Credit Keith Dambrot, in Part, for Developing Him into the Future Hall of Fame Player and Man He Is Today. [Derived Headline]

By DiPAOLA, Jerry; Adamski, Chris | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, March 28, 2017 | Go to article overview

Dambrot Charged with Reviving Dukes; LeBron James Took to Twitter on Sunday to Credit Keith Dambrot, in Part, for Developing Him into the Future Hall of Fame Player and Man He Is Today. [Derived Headline]


DiPAOLA, Jerry, Adamski, Chris, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


LeBron James took to Twitter on Sunday to credit Keith Dambrot, in part, for developing him into the future Hall of Fame player and man he is today.

On Thursday, Duquesne will formally introduce Dambrot as its new coach at a news conference at PPG Paints Arena.

"Keith's combination of experience, leadership and success is almost unmatched," Dukes athletic director Dave Harper said in a statement released Tuesday morning. "We are blessed to have Keith leading our program. Beginning today, we will roll up our sleeves and purposefully work each day to ensure Duquesne is a highly valued member of the Atlantic 10 and target competing at the top of the conference in men's basketball."

Dambrot won two Ohio state high school championships at Akron St. Vincent-St. Mary High School in 2000 and '01 when James was a freshman and sophomore. Speaking after playing in a game for the Cleveland Cavaliers on Monday night, James said he was supportive of Dambrot's move.

" 'Coach D' has paid his dues more than any other coach in Akron history," James told reporters in San Antonio. "The fact that he's willing and ready to make a change I think is great."

Dambrot has won 413 games at the college level, including a 305-139 record in 13 seasons at Akron, a member of the Mid-American Conference.

"I'm just excited to come to my second school," Dambrot told the Tribune-Review on Monday. "I know the history of Duquesne."

Dambrot's father, Sid, played at Duquesne from 1952-54 with the legendary Dick Ricketts and Sihugo Green. In those days, Duquesne was a national power, winning an NIT championship in 1955.

"Just as Keith's father, Sid, helped make the Duquesne name synonymous with college basketball in the 1950s, we look forward to Keith energizing our program as we embark on a new era of Duquesne basketball," Duquesne president Ken Gormley said in a released statement.

Dambrot, 58, did not have a losing season at Akron and won between 21 and 27 games for each of the past 12 years. He guided the Zips to three NCAA tournaments, most recently in 2013.

Asked to explain his success in the MAC, he said, "Hard work, good evaluation of players, good development of players, good coaching staff. It's not complicated."

Dambrot, who was seriously courted by Duquesne five years ago when the university hired Jim Ferry, said the school administration told him it's planning to increase its commitment to basketball. …

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