4 Couples Race to Discover Family History in BYUtv Show

By Rappleye, Christine | Deseret News (Salt Lake City), March 4, 2017 | Go to article overview

4 Couples Race to Discover Family History in BYUtv Show


Rappleye, Christine, Deseret News (Salt Lake City)


By Christine

Rappleye

Deseret News

Growing up, Joe Greer had "way more questions than answers" about his family.

Greer, a photographer who lives in Portland, never knew his father, and his mother died in a car accident when he was 4. He was raised by an aunt and uncle.

"I had dead ends searching," Greer said of his attempts to find relatives beyond those he knew.

Greer and his wife, Madison, are one of the four teams on the second season of BYUtv's "Relative Race," which premieres Sunday at 6 p.m.

This season, they start in Miami and race their way to Boston. Along the way, they will have to complete challenges related to their family history and stay with relatives they haven't previously met that they matched with using AncestryDNA.

Each team leaves their smartphone and any GPS device, gets a flip phone, paper maps and a vehicle during the race, according to information from the show. They have an allotted time for travel and challenges, and the slowest team gets a strike. After three strikes, they are out of the race and the running for the $50,000 prize.

The other teams are Kyla and Duley Williams of Smyrna, Tennessee, Justin and Brittany Stuart of Colorado Springs and Leo and Rolexis Schinsing of New Orleans.

"I was blown away," Joe Greer said during an interview at the recent RootsTech family history and technology conference. He said they had kept their expectations low going into the show because of how little he knew about his family tree, but there were many emotional moments.

The Williamses were on the first season of the show as relatives. Kyla Williams is a relative of Anthony Brown, who was racing with his wife, Brooke, and Duley Williams insisted they sleep in a tent during their overnight stay. Kyla Williams still keeps in touch with them.

"We're too much alike," she said of Anthony Brown, who is her fourth cousin. "It was so natural."

Duley Williams, who is a graphic designer, said as a native New Yorker, he's skeptical of bringing people he hasn't met into his home with his two young children, and he was at work when they arrived and didn't see his wife's text vouching for the Browns. …

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