Political Activism Inspired by Trump Shows No Signs of Slowing Down

By Bott, Celeste | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 9, 2017 | Go to article overview

Political Activism Inspired by Trump Shows No Signs of Slowing Down


Bott, Celeste, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


JEFFERSON CITY * After the 2016 election, Diane Redmond felt compelled to get involved in activism, but she wasn't sure how.

"I felt frustrated because I have a limited income and I didn't think I could help financially," said Redmond, a graphic designer who lives in St. Louis. "What I did have was time I could sacrifice and energy I could spare, despite working two jobs."

She eventually helped organize the Women's March on St. Louis in January and continues to encourage community advocacy through DefendHERS, a social justice organization in the city.

Redmond isn't alone. In the Show-Me state and nationwide, the unexpected election of President Donald Trump has inspired a new wave of political activism that doesn't seem to be letting up.

While most demonstrations have been held in opposition to Trump, his supporters in Missouri say they've also felt compelled to continue grass-roots organizing efforts, often led by people who don't have a history of being active in politics.

The controversial commander-in-chief has political newcomers turning out in droves, and experts say they haven't seen anything like it.

"Trump is just not a person you have moderate feelings about," said Ken Warren, a professor of political science at St. Louis University. "People are extremely for him or against him."

RECORD INVOLVEMENT

Protests against Trump in Missouri have mirrored national efforts. More than 10,000 people descended on St. Louis for the women's march in January, and similar events occurred across the country and internationally.

Thousands also protested Trump's executive order banning people from seven Muslim-majority nations from entering the United States, both outside of St. Louis Lambert International Airport and in downtown St. Louis.

Across Missouri, people are showing up, said Stephen Webber, who chairs the Missouri Democratic Party.

"I've been traveling the state speaking to groups almost every night. Everywhere, there's record turnout," Webber said. "There are people who say they've never come to a political meeting before."

Most recently, a failed attempt to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act sparked rallies throughout Missouri.

Even in Missouri's deeply red rural areas, Webber said, he's met people fearful of losing coverage, which motivates them to get involved.

But more broadly, "I think people have been appalled by Trump's behavior and now they're appalled by his policies," Webber said.

Daniela Velazquez, a spokeswoman for the ACLU of Missouri, said the organization continues to see record interest and donations ; more than 700 people inquired about volunteering after the election.

"The election drove home that there's a lot of work to do here," Velazquez said. "We see continual interest as people realize they can do something, or their rights may be at stake."

NO BUYER'S REMORSE

Typically, when your candidate wins, there's no need to continue holding rallies. But Trump supporters say they plan to keep on meeting and marching in support of the president, who they feel hasn't been given a fair shake in the media.

"People who supported Trump have no form of buyer's remorse. They're very much behind him," said Diane Neff, a St. Louis resident who helped organize a march for Trump this month in Jefferson City.

Neff has worked on elections for more than a decade, both as a paid staffer and as a volunteer. But this year is different.

"Once the candidate has been elected, people usually feel their job has been done and step aside," she said. "Now people still want to know what we're doing, and how they can help."

Among those helpers are people in their 40s who have never before voted in a presidential election, and senior citizens willing to drive hours to get signs and literature to pass out, Neff said.

"I think you can chalk that up to populism," said Clarissa Rile Hayward, an associate professor of political science at Washington University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Political Activism Inspired by Trump Shows No Signs of Slowing Down
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.