Students Selecting a College Increasingly Consider Long-Term Job Prospects, Debt

By MarksJarvis, Gail | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 9, 2017 | Go to article overview

Students Selecting a College Increasingly Consider Long-Term Job Prospects, Debt


MarksJarvis, Gail, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


It had to come to this.

For years, high school seniors hoping to go to college in the fall fixated on getting into their dream college. But that has changed. Students still are thinking about their campus visits and hoping to immerse themselves in a college culture that seems to best fit who they are. But in an era marked by job insecurity and student loan worries, concerns about keeping debt down and finding a decent job after graduation have turned the longing for the dream school into a secondary issue.

Since 2003, the Princeton Review has surveyed college applicants and their parents about the stress associated with the admission process and getting financial offers from colleges.

In 2003, with jobs plentiful and few people asking "Is college worth it?" only 56 percent of students and their parents said their stress was high. This year, 76 percent said they were worried about the financial aspects of college.

About 98 percent said this year that financial aid will be necessary to pay for college. Some 65 percent deemed aid as "extremely necessary."

Both students and their parents are focused on what happens after the college years. In a departure from the pre-recession period, 42 percent said this year that the main benefit of college is to get a better job and income. Much to the disappointment of educators, who want to tout the value of education for its own sake, fewer families think they can afford college for its intrinsic value alone. Only 33 percent say the main benefit of college is "exposure to new ideas" and 26 percent ranked "education" as the main objective.

With the cost of tuition, housing, food and other college expenses now totaling about $25,000 for one year at an in-state public universities and $50,000 a year for private colleges, the preoccupation with outcomes doesn't seem unrealistic for students who don't want to move into parents' basements after college graduation.

The job picture for recent college graduates has improved since the Great Recession, but it's still not reliable.

Only 46 percent of the students who were about to graduate in 2016 with bachelor's degrees had a job offer, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers, which does a survey of graduates each year. That's an improvement over 2009, when only 41 percent had offers , but it's far below the 80 percent who were graduating with jobs before the recession, said association researcher Kenneth Tsang.

In addition, pay levels have been stuck. Although college costs have been rising faster than inflation and the average college student with loans leaves college with about $30,000 in debt, the survey has found that salaries aren't budging. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Students Selecting a College Increasingly Consider Long-Term Job Prospects, Debt
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.