Dr. David Katz, Preventive Medicine: Is Fatter Better?

New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), April 9, 2017 | Go to article overview

Dr. David Katz, Preventive Medicine: Is Fatter Better?


A new study in the Annals of Internal Medicine tells us that the best weight for human beings is something pretty much like the native weight of human beings who are well fed and normally active. There is no one ideal weight for all, of course -- there is a range. And values outside the range might be advantageous in particular cases, especially when lower BMI is all about extreme fitness and stamina, or higher BMI is all about extra muscle mass. But in general, the body mass associated with the lowest rate of premature death from all causes looks a lot like the body mass of humans living as humans always did before we got escalators and willfully addictive junk food. Stated bluntly, lean is healthier than overweight, let alone obese.

Did we really need a study to tell us that the native weight range for our species is about right for the well-being of our species? We did, because we had managed to talk ourselves into alternatives, generally labeled the "obesity paradox." Studies have long suggested that body mass somewhat above our seemingly native state may confer a survival advantage.

Those of us with doubts about that association have long suggested an alternative explanation: sick people tend to lose weight. So, while it is probably disadvantageous to have surplus body fat, it is far worse to have had surplus body fat, and start losing it involuntarily due to potentially occult, smoldering disease. The debate itself has now smoldered for years, and even decades, populating its own channel in the peer-reviewed literature- and even conspiracy theories.

The new study is a robust, and perhaps even decisive reality check in this context. The authors looked at weight and mortality in roughly 250,000 people. But rather than just consider weight at one time, they looked at the association between maximum BMI over time and both disease and death.

Why would this adjustment matter? Well, someone who is overweight now may be much better off than someone who was comparably overweight once, but has now become "lean" because of as yet undiagnosed cancer. But someone who was never overweight in the first place might be better off still. Many prior studies of this topic were blind to just such crucial nuance; the current study focused on it.

The results are just what sense, and a consideration of all other species, would suggest. We don't see massively under-weight or over-weight squirrels flitting through the branches. There is some variation, of course, some of it inter-individual, much of it predictably seasonal, but by and large- all squirrels are reliably squirrel-size. …

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