Pianist Composing in His Own Style; Ligonier-Area Piano Teacher Leslie Nemeth Thinks So Much of Her Former Student Tyler Stoner That She Organized a Scholarship Fundraiser to Help Him on His Way to Attending Carnegie Mellon University. the Ligonier Valley High School Senior Will Enter CMU in the Fall to Study Music Composition. [Derived Headline]

By McMARLIN, Shirley | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, April 30, 2017 | Go to article overview

Pianist Composing in His Own Style; Ligonier-Area Piano Teacher Leslie Nemeth Thinks So Much of Her Former Student Tyler Stoner That She Organized a Scholarship Fundraiser to Help Him on His Way to Attending Carnegie Mellon University. the Ligonier Valley High School Senior Will Enter CMU in the Fall to Study Music Composition. [Derived Headline]


McMARLIN, Shirley, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Ligonier-area piano teacher Leslie Nemeth thinks so much of her former student Tyler Stoner that she organized a scholarship fundraiser to help him on his way to attending Carnegie Mellon University. The Ligonier Valley High School senior will enter CMU in the fall to study music composition.

The fundraiser will take the form of a piano recital during which Stoner, 18, will play some of his own pieces, along with music by better-known composers with names like Beethoven and Brahms.

Attendees will have a chance to see why Nemeth labels Stoner "a remarkable young performer." Stoner, in turn, credits parents Amy and Bob and brother Trey for always supporting him.

The recital will begin at 2 p.m. May 7 in the Ligonier Town Hall auditorium, with a reception following. Suggested donation is $8, or $5 for students.

Question: When did you start on the piano?

Answer: I started playing with Mrs. Nemeth when I was 7. It was something that my parents wanted me to pursue. My mom said she always wanted piano lessons when she was little. Both of (my parents) dabbled in some instruments and my brother took piano as well.

I didn't really like it when I was little and I didn't practice very much. It was something I stopped doing in about third or fourth grade.

Q: Obviously you got serious about it at some point.

A: My brother had just started college, and when he came back home for the summer, he had gotten into classical music. So then I got into classical music, and I started playing again when I was 14. It just became a big passion of mine. That made it obviously very different, because it was my pursuit then.

I started teaching myself a little bit and went back to Mrs. Nemeth for a while, and then I started taking classes at the CMU music preparatory school.

Q: When did you get into composing?

A: It was shortly after I took (piano) up again when I was 14. I always liked to imitate things that I like, so I would hear this cool music and I wanted to make my own.

Q: What are your influences? …

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Pianist Composing in His Own Style; Ligonier-Area Piano Teacher Leslie Nemeth Thinks So Much of Her Former Student Tyler Stoner That She Organized a Scholarship Fundraiser to Help Him on His Way to Attending Carnegie Mellon University. the Ligonier Valley High School Senior Will Enter CMU in the Fall to Study Music Composition. [Derived Headline]
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